Traditional recipes

Jacques Pépin vs. Gordon Ramsay? Not Really

Jacques Pépin vs. Gordon Ramsay? Not Really


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The esteemed French chef takes to Facebook to explain his position further about "reality" TV cooking shows

Pépin took issue with the way that kitchens are depicted on programs like Ramsay's "Kitchen Nightmares."

On July 14, we published a piece by famed chef, cookbook author, and television personality Jacques Pépin, a member of The Daily Meal Council, taking issue with aspects of the so-called reality cooking shows that are now so popular on TV. Pépin didn't mention "shouty chef" (as another website calls him) Gordon Ramsay by name, but did cite his show Hell's Kitchen for its "cruel rivalry and conflict" — and Russ Parsons of the Los Angeles Times headlined his article on Pépin's piece "That's reality: Jacques Pépin gives Gordon Ramsay a whipping." Numerous other websites and publications have picked up the theme, positioning our piece as an attack on Ramsay.

At noon today, Pépin posted a further elucidation of his points about TV food shows on his Facebook page.

"Many of you may have seen my article in The Daily Meal," he wrote. "It was certainly not my intention to insult Gordon Ramsay, who in my opinion is a very good, professionally trained chef, or anyone else for that matter. And I understand well the demands that television has put on him and others like him to create excitement.

"For me, the point is that the world of the truly professional chef is a controlled, disciplined, and respectful environment. Aspiring young chefs who consider entering the culinary trade get a false impression from these programs which are for entertainment. The only real reason to become a chef is because it fulfills you, and makes you happy to please people through your food. If you are dedicated and work hard with integrity and commitment, and if a little luck is on your side, it may happen that you gain some notoriety for your efforts. However, much more likely is that you won’t. But, if you enter the trade for the right reasons, you will still have a happy and fulfilling life. —JP"

As usual, Pépin shows himself to be a gentleman — which cannot necessarily be said of, well, every chef who's out there.


Gordon Ramsay’s Got Serious Beef With These 11 People

If there’s one person who really loves to have a good, shady row in public, it’s celebrity and world-class chef Gordon Ramsay. While his temper is famously memorialized on shows he hosts like Kitchen Nightmares and Hotel Hell, that temper might come back again in his new show, The F Word. Of course, The F Word looks like it’s going to be a bit more light-hearted than his earlier shows, but hey, if his history of famous feuds is anything to go by, then a flare-up could happen at any time.

Looking at his track record, Ramsay’s been in the center of some very famous feuds in his time. Mostly, Ramsay has been ready to pick a bone or two or throw some shade at a plethora of other famous chefs &mdash he even went to court over one particularly nasty incident with his father-in-law.


Boeuf Bourguignon Classique, the Jacques Pépin one

Many people have tasted my boeuf bourguignon, and many people want the recipe afterwards. It is the best version I have ever found, and it’s by no other than Jacques Pépin. The recipe was taken from Food & Wine magazine, April 2007 issue. Serve with a robust and full-bodied Cabernet Sauvignon.

Beef Stew in Red Wine Sauce

“This is the quintessential beef stew. Jacques Pépin’s mother served it at her restaurant, Le Pélican, where she made it with tougher cuts of meat. Jacques likes the flatiron—a long, narrow cut that’s extremely lean but becomes tender and stays moist. He doesn’t use stock, demiglace or even water in his stew, relying on robust red wine for the deep-flavored sauce.”

  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 pounds trimmed beef flatiron steak or chuck, cut into 8 pieces
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup finely chopped onion
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • One 750-milliliter bottle dry red wine
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 thyme sprig
  • One 5-ounce piece of pancetta
  • 15 pearl or small cipollini onions, peeled
  • 15 cremini mushrooms
  • 15 baby carrots, peeled
  • Sugar
  • Chopped fresh parsley, for garnish

Preheat the oven to 350°. In a large enameled cast-iron casserole, melt the butter in 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Arrange the meat in the casserole in a single layer and season with salt and pepper. Cook over moderately high heat, turning occasionally, until browned on all sides, 8 minutes. Add the chopped onion and garlic and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the onion is softened, 5 minutes. Add the flour and stir to coat the meat with it. Add the wine, bay leaves and thyme, season with salt and pepper and bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve any brown bits stuck to the bottom of the pot.

Cover the casserole and transfer it to the oven. Cook the stew for 1 1/2 hours, until the meat is very tender and the sauce is flavorful.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, cover the pancetta with 2 cups of water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Drain the pancetta and slice it 1/2 inch thick, then cut the slices into 1-inch-wide lardons.

In a large skillet, combine the pancetta, pearl onions, mushrooms and carrots. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil, 1/4 cup of water and a large pinch each of sugar, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer until almost all of the water has evaporated, 15 minutes. Uncover and cook over high heat, tossing, until the vegetables are tender and nicely browned, about 4 minutes.

To serve, stir some of the vegetables and lardons into the stew and scatter the rest on top as a garnish. Top with a little chopped parsley and serve.


10 People Who Have Gordon Ramsay on Their Shitlist

Now that Gordon Ramsay has managed to piss off even more people with the revelation that he has applied for UK trademark rights to "The Spotted Pig," the same name as April Bloomfield and Ken Friedman's New York restaurant, it's a good time to take a look at all the people Ramsay has been pissing off over the past couple of years. Some anger has been expressed formally via many, many lawsuits, while matters have been aired in the media or over Twitter. Here now, 10 people who count Gordon Ramsay on their shitlists, including his family members, business partners and fellow chefs.

1) Anthony Bourdain: In light of the news that Ramsay had applied for the UK trademark rights to April Bloomfield and Ken Friedman's The Spotted Pig, Bourdain spoke up in defense of the New York restaurateurs. Bourdain called Ramsay's move "pathetic" and "shameless."

2) Jamie Oliver: Also related to the Spotted Pig debacle, Oliver concurred with Bourdain and added that "we like originals" in London. Oliver has feuded with Ramsay before, accusing him of being disrespectful of Indian chefs and just generally exchanging a whole ton of barbs throughout the years.

3) His Father-In-Law: Following a year and a half long drama-filled battle, Ramsay won a £250,000 lawsuit against his father-in-law Chris Hutcheson for wrongly withdrawing millions of dollars, hacking Ramsay's computer, bankrolling his mistress and many other accusations.

4) His Father-In-Law's Mistress: Hutcheson's former mistress Sara Stewart has filed a lawsuit against Ramsay for breach of privacy. Per the lawsuit, Ramsay allegedly hired a private detective to take "intimate" photos of Stewart and Hutcheson and sent a text message to her son threatening to go public with the shots.

5) His Former Business Partner: Ramsay is also suing his former business partner Danny Lavy to stop Lavy's company Sensio from distributing his "Everyday" line of kitchenware at Kmart stores. Lavy claims a letter of intent both parties signed last year is a binding agreement, while Ramsay disagrees. For more backstory to this feud, don't forget that Ramsay also sued Lavy's Montreal restaurant Laurier BBQ earlier this year for booting him from a consulting gig for reportedly never showing up.

6) Marcus Samuelsson: One of the juicy tidbits from Marcus Samuelsson's memor Yes, Chef involved this one time Gordon Ramsay called him a "fucking black bastard" for not naming Ramsay among his favorite British chefs. Ramsay's spokesman denies the account, accusing Samuelsson of writing it simply "in order to garner publicity" for his book.

7) A former News of the World Editor: Ramsay settled a lawsuit earlier this year against the British tabloid's former editor Phil Hall, who admitted to obtaining information about Ramsay by "illegitimate means." This, of course, relates to Ramsay's legal issues with his father-in-law.

8) A New Zealand Events Company: Ramsay settled a lawsuit with a New Zealand events company for $81,000 after the company claimed he failed to appear at a fundraiser.

9) Mario Batali: In late 2008, Ramsay and Batali had a great period of feuding in which Ramsay continually referred to Batali as "Fanta pants" and Batali banned the shouty chef from his restaurants. Though Ramsay once called stories of the feud "cow shit," he continues to make fat jokes and, well, The Spotted Pig is also one of Batali's investments.

10) A Whole Bunch of Other Chefs: Legendary French chef Jacques Pepin has expressed issues with Ramsay, saying "I wasn't crazy about Hell's Kitchen. . When I saw a show like that where everyone is yelling, everyone gets terrorized, there is no way you can produce great food under that type of condition. You cannot give of yourself." Meanwhile, Eric Ripert has been famously critical of Ramsay's "racist" verbal abuse on Kitchen Nightmares — comments he has made more than once. Finally, José Andrés has also been famously embarrassed by the way Ramsay treated people on Hell's Kitchen.


A History of Celebrity Chefs Insulting the Crap Out of Each Other

Who knew there was so much drama in the food world? With all these chef turned TV stars throwing some minor (and major) shade, we kind of want a Real World-esque reality show where they all live in a house together, cook some food and shade the crap out of each other.

Couldn't you see Ina Garten telling Rachael Ray to "step the hell off"? Or Guy Fieri getting all up in Bobby Flay's face over who controls the grill? No? Well, try to imagine that because it's awesome.

Here's a brief history of celebrity chefs getting saucy, just in case MTV needs a cast list for Real World: Celebrity Chefs.

Anthony Bourdain on Ina Garten: "I don't want to live in her house. I don't want to spend a weekend there. It gets weird in Ina Land. 'Oh, when Jeffrey gets home, he'll be so happy I made meatloaf.' And then he comes home and you're pretty sure he's not into meatloaf."

Anthony Bourdain on Adam Richman: "Why did we watch [Man vs. Food]? Admit it. You wanted him to die. The show confirms [other countries'] worst suspicions—that Americans are fat, lazy, slothful, [and] wasteful. I know what [the viewer] is thinking, ɺmerica is a terrible place. I want to join ISIS.'"

Eric Ripert on Gordon Ramsay: "Watched kitchen nightmares=RACIST content, verbal abuse, humiliation etc. Shame on Gordon & production of show! Not an inspiration of leadership."

Emeril Lagasse on Rachael Ray: The Food Network star once said she "doesn't know anything about food. I would not put her on."

Tyler Florence on Anthony Bourdain: "If you take a look at Anthony Bourdain, have you ever seen that guy put anything on a plate? What gives him the right to say anything about anybody?"

Trending Stories

See Every Risky Red Carpet Look at the 2021 Billboard Music Awards

Megan Fox Pokes Fun at Her and Machine Gun Kelly's Sizzling Looks

North West, Penelope Disick and Their BFFs Twin in Matching Swimsuits

Andrew Zimmern on Tyler Florence: "Monday's episode [of Momma's Boys] featured the worlds least talented TV chef, Tyler Florence, once again churning out the questionable cooking advice and leading the ladies through a menu of the mom's fave recipes. Watching Florence wolf down the food, stare and ogle every ass that strolled by his cutting board and play the role of local TV stud was high comedy of the highest order."

Tyler Florence in response to Andrew Zimmern: "This guy Andrew Zimmern, the guy who eats dried camel c--k for a living, has decided to dis my life's work because I did, my personal friend, Ryan Seacrest, a favor and helped him out with his first big television production, Momma's Boys. It was a big hit for NBC and something I had a fun time doing. It's bubble gum reality, who cares? It was funny. I guess it hard to have a since of humor when you're on your 10th take of eating Yak testicles, smiling to the camera, wondering where your life went wrong. Mmmmm, delicious! Go get ɾm guys."

Anthony Bourdain on Rachael Ray: "We know she can't cook. She shrewdly tells us so. So, what is she selling us? Really? She's selling us satisfaction, the smug reassurance that mediocrity is quite enough."

Anthony Bourdain on Guy Fieri, part 1: "I don't dislike Guy Fieri, I realized, after many viewings of his cooking shows, much soul-searching at my personal ashram and many doses of prescription hypnotics. I just dislike—really dislike, the idea that somebody would put Texas-style barbecue inside a f--king nori roll."

Anthony Bourdain on Guy Fieri, part 2: "I sort of feel in a heartfelt way for Guy. I wonder about him. He's 52 years old and still rolling around in the flame outfit. What does he do? How does Guy Fieri de-douche?"

Gordon Ramsay on Bobby Flay: "That's why I laugh when they say, 'Let's see if he's a real chef. Let's get him up against Bobby Flay on Iron Chef. I'm like, ɿ--king do me a favor, come on. I've forgotten more than he's known!'"

Bobby Flay on Gordon Ramsey, following the Iron Chef comment: "Disappointed but noted. Let's settle this like men, in the kitchen! No words, just knives. Show up or shut up."

Martha Stewart on Gwyneth Paltrow: "She just needs to be quiet. She's a movie star. If she were confident in her acting, she wouldn't be trying to be Martha Stewart."

Gordon Ramsay on Jamie Oliver: "Last time I complained about the food at a restaurant was at Jamie Oliver's Restaurant."

Anthony Bourdain on Paula Deen: "The worst, most dangerous person to America is clearly Paula Deen. She revels in unholy connections with evil corporations and she's proud of the fact that her food is f--king bad for you. Plus, her food sucks."

Paula Deen on Anthony Bourdain: "You know, not everybody can afford to pay $58 for prime rib or $650 for a bottle of wine. My friends and I cook for regular families who worry about feeding their kids and paying the bills. It wasn't that long ago that I was struggling to feed my family, too."

Marco Pierre White on Gordon Ramsey: "I will never speak to him again. I gave him his first break in the business and I believe strongly in being loyal to people who have helped you."

Jamie Oliver on Gordon Ramsay: "Gordon will do anything to try and take the piss out of me because he is deeply jealous and can't quite work out why I do what I do and why he can't do that."

Anthony Bourdain on Alice Waters: "Alice Waters annoys the living s--t out of me. We're all in the middle of a recession, like we're all going to start buying expensive organic food and running to the green market. There's something very Khmer Rouge about Alice Waters that has become unrealistic. I'm suspicious of orthodoxy, the kind of orthodoxy when it comes to what you put in your mouth."

Jacques Pepin on Gordon Ramsay: "The worst offenders insult and humiliate their crew, cursing and swearing, with every other word a bleeped expletive."

Alton Brown on Anthony Bourdain: "When was the last time you saw Anthony Bourdain actually cook anything? I've spent 14 years cooking my own food on television and I've never seen him cook a meal."

Anthony Bourdain on Sandra Lee: "Pure evil. This frightening Hell Spawn of Kathie Lee and Betty Crocker seems on a mission to kill her fans, one meal at a time. She Must Be Stopped. Her death-dealing can-opening ways will cut a swath of destruction through the world if not contained."

Martha Stewart on Rachael Ray: "Well, to me, she professed that she. cannot bake. She just did a new cookbook which is just a re-edit of a lot of her old recipes. and that's not good enough for me."

Marcus Wareing on Gordon Ramsay: "If I never speak to that guy again for the rest of my life. It wouldn't bother me one bit."

See? Major shade. And we just thought up a tagline for the Real World: Celebrity Chefs show: "The food cooking on the stove isn't the only thing getting salty." You're welcome, world!


5. Anthony Bourdain vs. Adam Richman

He joked about Adam Richman’s show Man vs. Food. | Paul Zimmerman/Getty Images for Turner

Anthony Bourdain has a much higher profile than Adam Richman, who used to host the show Man vs. Food. But that didn’t stop Bourdain from insulting Richman onstage at a standup performance in Atlanta. “Why did we watch that show? Admit it. You wanted him to die,” Bourdain joked. Bourdain said that on his travels, he noticed that Richman’s show had gained popularity in countries like Yemen, Iran, Libya, and Afghanistan. In Bourdain’s view, “The show confirms their worst suspicions—that Americans are fat, lazy, slothful, [and] wasteful.”

Fortunately, the insult might not have been quite as sincere as it seemed. Richman later answered an interview question about Bourdain’s joke. He explained, “Tony is actually a friend of mine and I talked to him about it. I was like ‘You threw me under the bus.’ I understand the need for a good line but I hope that his want of a good friend is greater than that, and he made it clear that it was.”

Next: These infamous celebrity chefs have feuded for years.


Recipe: Jacques Pepin’s Beef Bourguignon (Beef Stew In Red Wine Sauce)

Adapted from Jacques Pepin in Food & Wine.

Melt in your mouth unctuousness is the best way to describe this dish. Perfect for a lazy Autumn or winter Sunday afternoon, or anytime you want stick to your ribs goodness.

I learned, from watching the Food Network, that the base of a stew was water or some type of stock, like beef or chicken. I recall watching Jacques Pepin make his stew on PBS by pouring in an entire bottle of red wine, and no other liquid. That got my attention.

I modified this dish by using a lower heat, a technique I learned from Michael Pollan’s book, Cooked, and added a small can of tomato paste, for color and thickening. I always serve this dish over French style sauteed root vegetables recipe here, or you can ladle over pasta, rice, or any vegetables you like.

Serves 5-6 with leftovers, 4-6 hours cooking time

What You’ll Need

Beef Chuck, 2 pounds, cut into 1″ cubes, local, grass fed,

Short Ribs, 4 large, on the bone, local, grass fed

Bacon, 2 thick slices, smoked, nitrate free, chopped

Red Wine, 1 bottle of your favorite, I like a Bordeaux or Cabernet Sauvignon

Carrots, 2 large, chopped fine

Onion, 1 large, chopped fine

Celery, 2 stalks, chopped fine

Garlic, 5 cloves, chopped fine

Olive oil, extra virgin, 4-5 tbsp

Tomato paste, one 6 oz can

Thyme, fresh, 2 tbsp, chopped, or 1 tbsp dried

Sea salt & pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 250°. Heat over medium-high heat a large enameled cast-iron casserole, then arrange the meat in a single layer and cook, turning occasionally, until browned on all sides, 8 minutes. Remove the meat.

Adjust the heat to medium, add the bacon and cook until crispy, stirring often. Add the chopped onion and 1 tbsp olive oil and cook over low-medium heat, stirring occasionally until the onion is softened, 5 minutes, scraping up the bits of meat. Add the garlic, carrots, and celery, and cook for 5 more minutes. Add enough wine to scrape the remaining bits of meat from the bottom, add the rest of the wine, bay leaves and thyme, season with salt and pepper and bring to a boil.

Cover the casserole and transfer it to the oven. Cook the stew for 4-6 hours, until the meat is very tender and the sauce is flavorful. (It will probably be ready in 1 1/2 hour, but cooking it for 4-6 hours transforms it from a good dish to a masterpiece.)

To serve, ladle some of the vegetables into a bowl, top with the stew and garnish with some fresh chopped parsley. Bon appetit!


Recipe Summary

  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 pounds trimmed beef flatiron steak or chuck, cut into 8 pieces
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup finely chopped onion
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • One 750-milliliter bottle dry red wine
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 thyme sprig
  • One 5-ounce piece of pancetta
  • 15 pearl or small cipollini onions, peeled
  • 15 cremini mushrooms
  • 15 baby carrots, peeled
  • Sugar
  • Chopped fresh parsley, for garnish

Preheat the oven to 350°. In a large enameled cast-iron casserole, melt the butter in 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Arrange the meat in the casserole in a single layer and season with salt and pepper. Cook over moderately high heat, turning occasionally, until browned on all sides, 8 minutes. Add the chopped onion and garlic and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the onion is softened, 5 minutes. Add the flour and stir to coat the meat with it. Add the wine, bay leaves and thyme, season with salt and pepper and bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve any brown bits stuck to the bottom of the pot.

Cover the casserole and transfer it to the oven. Cook the stew for 1 1/2 hours, until the meat is very tender and the sauce is flavorful.

Meanwhile, in a saucepan, cover the pancetta with 2 cups of water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Drain the pancetta and slice it 1/2 inch thick, then cut the slices into 1-inch-wide lardons.

In a large skillet, combine the pancetta, pearl onions, mushrooms and carrots. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil, 1/4 cup of water and a large pinch each of sugar, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer until almost all of the water has evaporated, 15 minutes. Uncover and cook over high heat, tossing, until the vegetables are tender and nicely browned, about 4 minutes.

To serve, stir some of the vegetables and lardons into the stew and scatter the rest on top as a garnish. Top with a little chopped parsley and serve.


Okay let's settle this once and for all. Who makes the best scrambled eggs?

UPDATE: currently, Ramsay is winning. Pépin is in second place. Alton and u/toddkent's grandmother are tied for third place.

UPDATE #2: Based on the number of points of the respective comments, Ramsay is still winning. Pépin, Alton and u/toddkent's grandmother are tied for second.

UPDATE #3: Ramsay is still kickin' ass, but it's not a runaway yet, u/toddkent's grandma is gaining traction, having surpassed Alton (3rd) and Pépin (close 4th).

Edit: okay, there's some long overdue clarification needed here: it's not so much adding crème fraîche but the way they cook them that gives the final product. Basically, it's curdy Alton vs. creamy Ramsay.

UPDATE #4: Grandma is two points behind Ramsay! This is crazy.

Note to self: try making eggs like this (French omelette), this (Japanese omelet), along with u/ponyrides comment and, this (Chinese custard), along with u/thaw12's comment.
I was prompted to explore other countries' methods of cooking eggs because of this comment, because at the end of Jamie Oliver's video he reminds us that every country has their way of doing eggs.
This means this post is truly a debate over whether American or English scrambled eggs are more popular.

UPDATE #5: Well, looks like u/toddkent's grandma is winning. Yes, I know, most of you are talking about your respective grandmothers, but it doesn't matter. All of your grandmothers are disqualified from the race unless you post an instructional video featuring them making scrambled eggs. Read the top edit about posting a video if you think someone other than Ramsay or Alton does it better. Sorry, I don't make up the rules.

UPDATE #6: At this point I believe the topic has been beaten to death. Ramsay is a clear winner, another update to follow should someone's grandmother grow a pair and post a video.


Watch the video: Jacques Pepin omelette omelet (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. More

    Remarkable question

  2. Wally

    I would love to read your other articles. Thanks.

  3. Fraomar

    Great phrase

  4. Wanrrick

    Excuse for that I interfere... To me this situation is familiar. Let's discuss.

  5. Xihuitl

    I'll take a look for a change ...

  6. Reed

    Anything can happen, maybe your blog will rise in the Yandex rating for such a post. Let's see.



Write a message