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Las Vegas’ Best Casual Restaurants

Las Vegas’ Best Casual Restaurants


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Las Vegas is known as The City of Sin, and this moniker was earned by the opulent displays of decadence that can be found around the city every day. This holds true for its dining scene, as Vegas is home to some of the best restaurants in America (Joël Robuchon, Bouchon Bistro, and Guy Savoy, to name a few), and scores of establishments helmed by renowned celebrity chefs (think Michael Mina, Mario Batali, and Masaharu Morimoto). Sometimes, however, you want a more down-to-earth, low-key meal out, so we’ve gathered a list of some of the best casual restaurants in Las Vegas.

If you like to build your own burger, then Hubert Keller’s Burger Bar is a great casual option, which snagged a very respectable #6 spot in our burger compilation. Known as “the other Keller” (besides Thomas, obviously) to fine-dining enthusiasts who have long enjoyed his exquisitely crafted modern French food at Fleur de Lys in San Francisco, and to the Las Vegas dining public for having created a $5,000 hamburger at his Fleur in the Mandalay Bay Hotel, Keller is an accomplished Alsatian-born chef who has lately established a reputation for producing sensibly priced, high-quality burgers at his eatery (with additional locations in San Francisco and Beijing). The basic burger here is certified Angus beef on a plump bun with tomatoes, onions, lettuce, and dill pickle, but the menu allows for extravagant customization, offering roughly 50 accoutrements including such diverse choices as black truffles, smoked Gouda, jalapeño bacon, guacamole, and shrimp. There are also chicken wings, an extensive milkshake menu, and a sampler plate of buttermilk zucchini fries, macaroni and cheese croquettes, and more. The restaurant is situated in the mall-like Mandalay Place, and with a décor that includes high top bar tables and a long bar decked out with multiple televisions, we’re sure you will feel right at home.

Fish N Bowl, located off the famed Strip, is easy to miss, but it’s a must-try if you’re looking for great sushi served in a laid-back environment. The space is small but cheerful due to the bright orange interior paint job and light wood tables and floor, and you can order classic rolls like California or Philly rolls, rice-less rolls like the Johnny Roll (shrimp tempura, spicy crab, cucumber skin, and “yum” sauce), or special rolls like the Green Monster (spicy tuna, cucumber, avocado, sriracha, green onion, and tuna poke on the side) and the Cinco de Mayo (shrimp tempura, jalapeño, avocado, tuna, eel sauce, and lime and jalapeño vinaigrette). They also offer rice bowls like the Mushroom Fantasy (assorted mushrooms, eggs, and shredded ginger) and the Kalbi Bowl (marinated short rib and green onion), as well as dishes like chicken or shrimp yakisoba and cucumber noodle salad.

From the creators of the Cheesecake Factory comes a luxurious, but still decidedly casual restaurant. A hybrid of grand European cafés and all-American eateries, the Grand Lux Café, Venetian has an extensive menu for every time of day; there’s the breakfast menu that’s served from 6 a.m. to 11 a.m. and features dishes such as caramel banana-nut french toast that’s made with flakey brioche bread and drizzled with house-made caramel sauce, and the DeLux Breakfast Sandwich comprised of scrambled eggs, bacon, ham, grilled tomato, Havarti cheese, and mayo,

all piled high on grilled brioche and served with hash browns. Then there’s the lunch and dinner menu that’s available from 11:00 a.m. until midnight and includes plates of crispy Thai shrimp and chicken spring rolls, seared rare Ahi tuna salad, an impressive variety of specialty burgers, sandwiches, omelettes. For those who like breakfast all day long, they serve pizzas, pastas, “House Favorites,” “Grand Casual Cuisine,” dishes like a Parmesan-crusted pork chop and lemon chicken piccata, wood grilled steaks, and seafood specialties. Finally, for those late-night munchies, the eatery serves a menu of comfort foods like a smoked salmon platter with tomato, onion, cream cheese, and a toasted bagel; double-cheese mini sliders; and much, much more from midnight until 6 a.m. Don’t forget their extensive liquor program that includes many wines available by the glass and by the bottle, bottles of beer as well as a few on tap, margaritas, cognac, and a number of other cocktails and liquors.

Honesty is the best policy, and the Heart Attack Grill, with their Bypass Burgers, lives by that motto. Their double bypass burger is a celebration of carnivorous gluttony, stacked high with cheese, two burger patties, ten slices of bacon, and the option of adding on chili. But the Double Bypass is hardly the greatest abomination against health on the menu - that honor goes to the Octuplet Bypass burger, with its eight patties and forty slices of bacon, which snagged the #83 spot on our 101 Best Burgers in America list. There’s also the deep-fried Twinkie ice cream shake, onion rings, the half-pound Coronary Dog with chili, onions, and cheese, with the option of adding bacon. The atmosphere isn’t just casual, it’s downright kitschy; waitresses are dressed in “sexy” nurse uniforms, and bags of wine are served on IV poles. It’s a maximum serving of tongue-and-cheek amusement, and gut-busting, indulgent food.

Pizza Rock, one of the five pizzerias from California pizza king Tony Gemignani and the home of the #91 best pizza in America according to our compilation, doesn’t skimp on pizza preparation. There are at least four kinds of ovens (a 900-degree wood-fired Cirigliano Forni oven, a Rotoflex gas brick oven, a Marsal gas brick oven, and a Cuppone Italian electric brick oven) the pizza champ uses to send out his signature pies (in Napoletana, classic Italian, classic American, Sicilian, and Romano style) of which there are many impressive iterations in each category. You’re going to want to try to get your hands on one of the only 73 Margherita pies made daily using Gemignani’s award-winning recipe, or the even more exclusive Sausage & Stout pie, made with honey-malted Guinness dough, housemade mozzarella, beer sausage, caramelized onions, Fontina, green onions, crushed red peppers, beer salt, and Sweet Guinness reduction, of which there are only 23 made per day.

America’s best fast-food burger is found at Shake Shack, which is why it was ranked #2 on our burger compilation. Yes, it’s better than In-N-Out, and yes, it has its own secret menu… kind of (it’s called Danny Meyer’s hospitality philosophy), and yes, they have a Las Vegas outpost slated to open in December in the New York-New York Hotel and Casino. In 2004, restaurateur Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group won the bid to open a permanent kiosk in New York’s Madison Square Park, and massive lines, a cult following, and even a begrudging review from The New York Times followed. Why is it so good? Quality. And one of the juiciest cheeseburgers (100-percent all-natural Angus beef, no hormones, no antibiotics) you’ll ever find on a soft, grilled potato roll (make sure to ask for pickles and onions). Although it hasn’t opened quite yet (expected opening is December 2014), we can expect the laid-back vibe found at all of its other locations, with tables made of wood from reclaimed bowling alley lanes, lots of glass to let in natural light, and rumor has it there will also be a patio.

Kate Kolenda is the Restaurant and City Guide Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @BeefWerky and @theconversant.


Las Vegas restaurants guide: Where to eat on and off the Strip

Whether you’re dining on the Strip or far away from it, in the mood to blow obscene amounts of money or looking for a quick and affordable meal, our dining guide will serve as a shining beacon, like the light on top of Luxor. We scoured the city for the best places to eat, drink, and then eat and drink some more. Because while you’re visiting Vegas, you know to abide by the maxim, “Everything in moderation, including moderation.”

Best Friend at the Park MGM

Roy Choi has translated the vibe of his Kogi BBQ food trucks into a bumping dining room with a DJ and craveable Korean menu filled with kimchi fried rice, kimchi jjigaen and sizzling platters of kalbi . Even if you’re not eating there, the entrance — a liquor store/bar full of Best Friend merch and boozy slushees — is worth popping into. — JH

Le Cirque at Bellagio

You’ll feel like you’re eating under the big top at Le Cirque, where the dining room is ringed by antiquated circus scenes and covered by a billowing purple-yellow-orange canopy. It comes off as opulent instead of campy, and playfully offsets the formal, rigorous French cuisine: Burgundy snails in black garlic herb butter veal sweetbreads sauteed foie gras, creme brûlée. Be sure to request a table with a view of the Bellagio fountains. — AC

All-you-can-eat buffets are the most American thing imaginable.

The Cosmopolitan

Pound for pound the Cosmopolitan houses the best food on the Strip. Highlights include dinner with a show at Rose Rabbit Lie, fried chicken at Momofuku, drippy egg sandwich at Eggslut, croquetas served in sneakers at Jose Andres’ Jaleo and literally everything at the Block 16 food hall (but especially Andy Ricker’s Pok Pok wings, all the sandwiches at Lardo and hot chicken from Hattie B’s). — JH

3708 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 698-7000, cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

Mott 32 at Palazzo

Don’t let the multiple elaborate dining rooms fool you. Mott 32 serves straight Chinese comfort food, including plates of soy sauce chow fun your Chinese grandmother would approve of. The superb Peking duck is marinated, then smoked, then roasted over applewood until the skin is brittle-crisp. — JH

3325 S. Las Vegas Blvd., #206, Las Vegas, (702) 607-3232, mott32.com/lasvegas

Mesa Grill at Caesars Palace

Bobby Flay’s Southwestern standby is the place to grab dinner before catching Mariah Carey at the Colosseum. This is fun, punchy, chili-fueled food meant for sharing: goat cheese queso fundido, red chili barbecue duck and a 22-ounce chipotle-glazed rib-eye. — JH

3570 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 731-7731, mesagrill.com

Oyster Bar at Palace Station

There are certain truths about Vegas: You will lose money over time and you will have to wait in a line that snakes past the slot machines for a seat at the Oyster Bar. The counter-only restaurant is open 24 hours, offering half-shell specials in the mornings. But just about everyone orders the combo pan roast, a supremely creamy and tomato-y concoction loaded with shrimp, crab and lobster, made in front of you in bubbling silver steam kettles. — AC

Spago at Bellagio

Wolfgang Puck, the catalyst for the celebrity chef boom in Las Vegas in the ’90s, has re-created the magic of the Beverly Hills Spago once again, this time at the Bellagio (the restaurant was in the Caesars Forum Shops from 1992 to 2018). Get the signature smoked salmon pizza, veal schnitzel and Chinois salad, all served with a complementary view of the Bellagio fountains. — JH

3600 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 693-8181, wolfgangpuck.com/dining/spago-lv

Carbone at Aria

The tableside Caesar salad is reason enough to visit. The dressing is anchovy-flecked perfection and the Lego-sized croutons are mini rectangles of fried dough that burst with garlic butter when you take a bite. The spicy rigatoni in pink sauce — and the rest of the very “Goodfellas” Italian-American menu — is just as good as at the original location in New York City. — JH

Bobby’s Burger Palace outside the Waldorf Astoria

Bobby Flay built his career on Southwestern flavors predictably, the green chili cheeseburger (with queso and pickled red onions) is one of the best burgers you can find on the Strip. Bobby’s is a casual, choose-your-own-burger adventure (beef, chicken, turkey) where you can add crushed potato chips to your burger for free. — JH

3750 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 598-0191, bobbysburgerpalace.com

Here are six great off-Strip places to help ensure you’re making the most of your time in Vegas.

Sadelle’s at Bellagio

The sumptuous sky-blue dining room at Sadelle’s is the place to be for a Fancy Event Brunch. Splash the pot and order the tower of smoked fish served with bagels stacked high like a ring toss for $125 get a delectable grapefruit cocktail, each triangle carved out and brûléed, for $14 add caviar to any dish for $60 a pop. A couple tips: Skip the line (often winding into Bellagio’s atrium) and snag a seat at the bar — and grab a crackly sticky bun from the pink pastry cart on the way out. — AC

Restaurant Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace

Guy Savoy has all the trappings you expect from a traditional super-luxe French restaurant: a wine tome that would buckle a card table, an army of doting servers, trolleys laden with breads and fussy desserts. Unfortunately, it all feels a bit uninspired and paint-by-numbers. Still, the white truffle risotto was almost worth the $140 supplementary charge and the A5 Wagyu-and-lobster combo was the consummate ideal of surf and turf. — AC

Bavette’s at Park MGM

The Vegas outlet of a French steakhouse from Chicago is ideal for a date: dark,moody, and romantic. The rib-eyes are rare, the wedge salads are ice-cold and the seafood towers will have other diners craning their necks.— JH

3770 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 730-6700, bavettessteakhouse.com/las-vegas

Tacos El Gordo

It’s a madhouse at the Strip outpost of Tacos El Gordo, where you line up for Tijuana-style tacos according to which meat you want. It’s not the most efficient process, but you won’t find a better adobada taco on a handmade corn tortilla at 4 a.m. — AC

3041 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 331-1160, tacoselgordobc.com

Joël Robuchon

You’ve won the jackpot and all that crazed screaming made you hungry. You will celebrate with a blowout meal at Joël Robuchon, from which, four hours later, you will emerge no longer famished — or wealthy. Yes, at $445 for the full degustation menu, it’s expensive. And yes, it’s worth it. It just feels right: the plush purple banquettes, the Baccarat crystal, the impeccable service, the … framed photo of Nicolas Cage? OK, maybe not that. Then there’s the food: indulgently overstuffed langoustine ravioli in foie gras sauce, Robuchon’s signature mashed potatoes and, naturally, a flawless chocolate souffle with the texture of the inside of a marshmallow just roasted on a campfire. If you’ve got money to roast, go for it. — AC and LKP

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon

If you didn’t do well enough at the tables to eat next door, L’Atelier is no mere consolation prize. The alarmingly red restaurant — barstools, water glasses, flowers, lighting — is an eye-catcher even through all the flashing neon on the casino floor. Sit at the counter and build your own prix fixe dinner. It’s unfussy, with food nearly as good as its extravagant sister restaurant. And the heavenly mashed potatoes are here, too. — AC


Las Vegas restaurants guide: Where to eat on and off the Strip

Whether you’re dining on the Strip or far away from it, in the mood to blow obscene amounts of money or looking for a quick and affordable meal, our dining guide will serve as a shining beacon, like the light on top of Luxor. We scoured the city for the best places to eat, drink, and then eat and drink some more. Because while you’re visiting Vegas, you know to abide by the maxim, “Everything in moderation, including moderation.”

Best Friend at the Park MGM

Roy Choi has translated the vibe of his Kogi BBQ food trucks into a bumping dining room with a DJ and craveable Korean menu filled with kimchi fried rice, kimchi jjigaen and sizzling platters of kalbi . Even if you’re not eating there, the entrance — a liquor store/bar full of Best Friend merch and boozy slushees — is worth popping into. — JH

Le Cirque at Bellagio

You’ll feel like you’re eating under the big top at Le Cirque, where the dining room is ringed by antiquated circus scenes and covered by a billowing purple-yellow-orange canopy. It comes off as opulent instead of campy, and playfully offsets the formal, rigorous French cuisine: Burgundy snails in black garlic herb butter veal sweetbreads sauteed foie gras, creme brûlée. Be sure to request a table with a view of the Bellagio fountains. — AC

All-you-can-eat buffets are the most American thing imaginable.

The Cosmopolitan

Pound for pound the Cosmopolitan houses the best food on the Strip. Highlights include dinner with a show at Rose Rabbit Lie, fried chicken at Momofuku, drippy egg sandwich at Eggslut, croquetas served in sneakers at Jose Andres’ Jaleo and literally everything at the Block 16 food hall (but especially Andy Ricker’s Pok Pok wings, all the sandwiches at Lardo and hot chicken from Hattie B’s). — JH

3708 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 698-7000, cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

Mott 32 at Palazzo

Don’t let the multiple elaborate dining rooms fool you. Mott 32 serves straight Chinese comfort food, including plates of soy sauce chow fun your Chinese grandmother would approve of. The superb Peking duck is marinated, then smoked, then roasted over applewood until the skin is brittle-crisp. — JH

3325 S. Las Vegas Blvd., #206, Las Vegas, (702) 607-3232, mott32.com/lasvegas

Mesa Grill at Caesars Palace

Bobby Flay’s Southwestern standby is the place to grab dinner before catching Mariah Carey at the Colosseum. This is fun, punchy, chili-fueled food meant for sharing: goat cheese queso fundido, red chili barbecue duck and a 22-ounce chipotle-glazed rib-eye. — JH

3570 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 731-7731, mesagrill.com

Oyster Bar at Palace Station

There are certain truths about Vegas: You will lose money over time and you will have to wait in a line that snakes past the slot machines for a seat at the Oyster Bar. The counter-only restaurant is open 24 hours, offering half-shell specials in the mornings. But just about everyone orders the combo pan roast, a supremely creamy and tomato-y concoction loaded with shrimp, crab and lobster, made in front of you in bubbling silver steam kettles. — AC

Spago at Bellagio

Wolfgang Puck, the catalyst for the celebrity chef boom in Las Vegas in the ’90s, has re-created the magic of the Beverly Hills Spago once again, this time at the Bellagio (the restaurant was in the Caesars Forum Shops from 1992 to 2018). Get the signature smoked salmon pizza, veal schnitzel and Chinois salad, all served with a complementary view of the Bellagio fountains. — JH

3600 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 693-8181, wolfgangpuck.com/dining/spago-lv

Carbone at Aria

The tableside Caesar salad is reason enough to visit. The dressing is anchovy-flecked perfection and the Lego-sized croutons are mini rectangles of fried dough that burst with garlic butter when you take a bite. The spicy rigatoni in pink sauce — and the rest of the very “Goodfellas” Italian-American menu — is just as good as at the original location in New York City. — JH

Bobby’s Burger Palace outside the Waldorf Astoria

Bobby Flay built his career on Southwestern flavors predictably, the green chili cheeseburger (with queso and pickled red onions) is one of the best burgers you can find on the Strip. Bobby’s is a casual, choose-your-own-burger adventure (beef, chicken, turkey) where you can add crushed potato chips to your burger for free. — JH

3750 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 598-0191, bobbysburgerpalace.com

Here are six great off-Strip places to help ensure you’re making the most of your time in Vegas.

Sadelle’s at Bellagio

The sumptuous sky-blue dining room at Sadelle’s is the place to be for a Fancy Event Brunch. Splash the pot and order the tower of smoked fish served with bagels stacked high like a ring toss for $125 get a delectable grapefruit cocktail, each triangle carved out and brûléed, for $14 add caviar to any dish for $60 a pop. A couple tips: Skip the line (often winding into Bellagio’s atrium) and snag a seat at the bar — and grab a crackly sticky bun from the pink pastry cart on the way out. — AC

Restaurant Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace

Guy Savoy has all the trappings you expect from a traditional super-luxe French restaurant: a wine tome that would buckle a card table, an army of doting servers, trolleys laden with breads and fussy desserts. Unfortunately, it all feels a bit uninspired and paint-by-numbers. Still, the white truffle risotto was almost worth the $140 supplementary charge and the A5 Wagyu-and-lobster combo was the consummate ideal of surf and turf. — AC

Bavette’s at Park MGM

The Vegas outlet of a French steakhouse from Chicago is ideal for a date: dark,moody, and romantic. The rib-eyes are rare, the wedge salads are ice-cold and the seafood towers will have other diners craning their necks.— JH

3770 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 730-6700, bavettessteakhouse.com/las-vegas

Tacos El Gordo

It’s a madhouse at the Strip outpost of Tacos El Gordo, where you line up for Tijuana-style tacos according to which meat you want. It’s not the most efficient process, but you won’t find a better adobada taco on a handmade corn tortilla at 4 a.m. — AC

3041 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 331-1160, tacoselgordobc.com

Joël Robuchon

You’ve won the jackpot and all that crazed screaming made you hungry. You will celebrate with a blowout meal at Joël Robuchon, from which, four hours later, you will emerge no longer famished — or wealthy. Yes, at $445 for the full degustation menu, it’s expensive. And yes, it’s worth it. It just feels right: the plush purple banquettes, the Baccarat crystal, the impeccable service, the … framed photo of Nicolas Cage? OK, maybe not that. Then there’s the food: indulgently overstuffed langoustine ravioli in foie gras sauce, Robuchon’s signature mashed potatoes and, naturally, a flawless chocolate souffle with the texture of the inside of a marshmallow just roasted on a campfire. If you’ve got money to roast, go for it. — AC and LKP

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon

If you didn’t do well enough at the tables to eat next door, L’Atelier is no mere consolation prize. The alarmingly red restaurant — barstools, water glasses, flowers, lighting — is an eye-catcher even through all the flashing neon on the casino floor. Sit at the counter and build your own prix fixe dinner. It’s unfussy, with food nearly as good as its extravagant sister restaurant. And the heavenly mashed potatoes are here, too. — AC


Las Vegas restaurants guide: Where to eat on and off the Strip

Whether you’re dining on the Strip or far away from it, in the mood to blow obscene amounts of money or looking for a quick and affordable meal, our dining guide will serve as a shining beacon, like the light on top of Luxor. We scoured the city for the best places to eat, drink, and then eat and drink some more. Because while you’re visiting Vegas, you know to abide by the maxim, “Everything in moderation, including moderation.”

Best Friend at the Park MGM

Roy Choi has translated the vibe of his Kogi BBQ food trucks into a bumping dining room with a DJ and craveable Korean menu filled with kimchi fried rice, kimchi jjigaen and sizzling platters of kalbi . Even if you’re not eating there, the entrance — a liquor store/bar full of Best Friend merch and boozy slushees — is worth popping into. — JH

Le Cirque at Bellagio

You’ll feel like you’re eating under the big top at Le Cirque, where the dining room is ringed by antiquated circus scenes and covered by a billowing purple-yellow-orange canopy. It comes off as opulent instead of campy, and playfully offsets the formal, rigorous French cuisine: Burgundy snails in black garlic herb butter veal sweetbreads sauteed foie gras, creme brûlée. Be sure to request a table with a view of the Bellagio fountains. — AC

All-you-can-eat buffets are the most American thing imaginable.

The Cosmopolitan

Pound for pound the Cosmopolitan houses the best food on the Strip. Highlights include dinner with a show at Rose Rabbit Lie, fried chicken at Momofuku, drippy egg sandwich at Eggslut, croquetas served in sneakers at Jose Andres’ Jaleo and literally everything at the Block 16 food hall (but especially Andy Ricker’s Pok Pok wings, all the sandwiches at Lardo and hot chicken from Hattie B’s). — JH

3708 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 698-7000, cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

Mott 32 at Palazzo

Don’t let the multiple elaborate dining rooms fool you. Mott 32 serves straight Chinese comfort food, including plates of soy sauce chow fun your Chinese grandmother would approve of. The superb Peking duck is marinated, then smoked, then roasted over applewood until the skin is brittle-crisp. — JH

3325 S. Las Vegas Blvd., #206, Las Vegas, (702) 607-3232, mott32.com/lasvegas

Mesa Grill at Caesars Palace

Bobby Flay’s Southwestern standby is the place to grab dinner before catching Mariah Carey at the Colosseum. This is fun, punchy, chili-fueled food meant for sharing: goat cheese queso fundido, red chili barbecue duck and a 22-ounce chipotle-glazed rib-eye. — JH

3570 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 731-7731, mesagrill.com

Oyster Bar at Palace Station

There are certain truths about Vegas: You will lose money over time and you will have to wait in a line that snakes past the slot machines for a seat at the Oyster Bar. The counter-only restaurant is open 24 hours, offering half-shell specials in the mornings. But just about everyone orders the combo pan roast, a supremely creamy and tomato-y concoction loaded with shrimp, crab and lobster, made in front of you in bubbling silver steam kettles. — AC

Spago at Bellagio

Wolfgang Puck, the catalyst for the celebrity chef boom in Las Vegas in the ’90s, has re-created the magic of the Beverly Hills Spago once again, this time at the Bellagio (the restaurant was in the Caesars Forum Shops from 1992 to 2018). Get the signature smoked salmon pizza, veal schnitzel and Chinois salad, all served with a complementary view of the Bellagio fountains. — JH

3600 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 693-8181, wolfgangpuck.com/dining/spago-lv

Carbone at Aria

The tableside Caesar salad is reason enough to visit. The dressing is anchovy-flecked perfection and the Lego-sized croutons are mini rectangles of fried dough that burst with garlic butter when you take a bite. The spicy rigatoni in pink sauce — and the rest of the very “Goodfellas” Italian-American menu — is just as good as at the original location in New York City. — JH

Bobby’s Burger Palace outside the Waldorf Astoria

Bobby Flay built his career on Southwestern flavors predictably, the green chili cheeseburger (with queso and pickled red onions) is one of the best burgers you can find on the Strip. Bobby’s is a casual, choose-your-own-burger adventure (beef, chicken, turkey) where you can add crushed potato chips to your burger for free. — JH

3750 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 598-0191, bobbysburgerpalace.com

Here are six great off-Strip places to help ensure you’re making the most of your time in Vegas.

Sadelle’s at Bellagio

The sumptuous sky-blue dining room at Sadelle’s is the place to be for a Fancy Event Brunch. Splash the pot and order the tower of smoked fish served with bagels stacked high like a ring toss for $125 get a delectable grapefruit cocktail, each triangle carved out and brûléed, for $14 add caviar to any dish for $60 a pop. A couple tips: Skip the line (often winding into Bellagio’s atrium) and snag a seat at the bar — and grab a crackly sticky bun from the pink pastry cart on the way out. — AC

Restaurant Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace

Guy Savoy has all the trappings you expect from a traditional super-luxe French restaurant: a wine tome that would buckle a card table, an army of doting servers, trolleys laden with breads and fussy desserts. Unfortunately, it all feels a bit uninspired and paint-by-numbers. Still, the white truffle risotto was almost worth the $140 supplementary charge and the A5 Wagyu-and-lobster combo was the consummate ideal of surf and turf. — AC

Bavette’s at Park MGM

The Vegas outlet of a French steakhouse from Chicago is ideal for a date: dark,moody, and romantic. The rib-eyes are rare, the wedge salads are ice-cold and the seafood towers will have other diners craning their necks.— JH

3770 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 730-6700, bavettessteakhouse.com/las-vegas

Tacos El Gordo

It’s a madhouse at the Strip outpost of Tacos El Gordo, where you line up for Tijuana-style tacos according to which meat you want. It’s not the most efficient process, but you won’t find a better adobada taco on a handmade corn tortilla at 4 a.m. — AC

3041 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 331-1160, tacoselgordobc.com

Joël Robuchon

You’ve won the jackpot and all that crazed screaming made you hungry. You will celebrate with a blowout meal at Joël Robuchon, from which, four hours later, you will emerge no longer famished — or wealthy. Yes, at $445 for the full degustation menu, it’s expensive. And yes, it’s worth it. It just feels right: the plush purple banquettes, the Baccarat crystal, the impeccable service, the … framed photo of Nicolas Cage? OK, maybe not that. Then there’s the food: indulgently overstuffed langoustine ravioli in foie gras sauce, Robuchon’s signature mashed potatoes and, naturally, a flawless chocolate souffle with the texture of the inside of a marshmallow just roasted on a campfire. If you’ve got money to roast, go for it. — AC and LKP

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon

If you didn’t do well enough at the tables to eat next door, L’Atelier is no mere consolation prize. The alarmingly red restaurant — barstools, water glasses, flowers, lighting — is an eye-catcher even through all the flashing neon on the casino floor. Sit at the counter and build your own prix fixe dinner. It’s unfussy, with food nearly as good as its extravagant sister restaurant. And the heavenly mashed potatoes are here, too. — AC


Las Vegas restaurants guide: Where to eat on and off the Strip

Whether you’re dining on the Strip or far away from it, in the mood to blow obscene amounts of money or looking for a quick and affordable meal, our dining guide will serve as a shining beacon, like the light on top of Luxor. We scoured the city for the best places to eat, drink, and then eat and drink some more. Because while you’re visiting Vegas, you know to abide by the maxim, “Everything in moderation, including moderation.”

Best Friend at the Park MGM

Roy Choi has translated the vibe of his Kogi BBQ food trucks into a bumping dining room with a DJ and craveable Korean menu filled with kimchi fried rice, kimchi jjigaen and sizzling platters of kalbi . Even if you’re not eating there, the entrance — a liquor store/bar full of Best Friend merch and boozy slushees — is worth popping into. — JH

Le Cirque at Bellagio

You’ll feel like you’re eating under the big top at Le Cirque, where the dining room is ringed by antiquated circus scenes and covered by a billowing purple-yellow-orange canopy. It comes off as opulent instead of campy, and playfully offsets the formal, rigorous French cuisine: Burgundy snails in black garlic herb butter veal sweetbreads sauteed foie gras, creme brûlée. Be sure to request a table with a view of the Bellagio fountains. — AC

All-you-can-eat buffets are the most American thing imaginable.

The Cosmopolitan

Pound for pound the Cosmopolitan houses the best food on the Strip. Highlights include dinner with a show at Rose Rabbit Lie, fried chicken at Momofuku, drippy egg sandwich at Eggslut, croquetas served in sneakers at Jose Andres’ Jaleo and literally everything at the Block 16 food hall (but especially Andy Ricker’s Pok Pok wings, all the sandwiches at Lardo and hot chicken from Hattie B’s). — JH

3708 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 698-7000, cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

Mott 32 at Palazzo

Don’t let the multiple elaborate dining rooms fool you. Mott 32 serves straight Chinese comfort food, including plates of soy sauce chow fun your Chinese grandmother would approve of. The superb Peking duck is marinated, then smoked, then roasted over applewood until the skin is brittle-crisp. — JH

3325 S. Las Vegas Blvd., #206, Las Vegas, (702) 607-3232, mott32.com/lasvegas

Mesa Grill at Caesars Palace

Bobby Flay’s Southwestern standby is the place to grab dinner before catching Mariah Carey at the Colosseum. This is fun, punchy, chili-fueled food meant for sharing: goat cheese queso fundido, red chili barbecue duck and a 22-ounce chipotle-glazed rib-eye. — JH

3570 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 731-7731, mesagrill.com

Oyster Bar at Palace Station

There are certain truths about Vegas: You will lose money over time and you will have to wait in a line that snakes past the slot machines for a seat at the Oyster Bar. The counter-only restaurant is open 24 hours, offering half-shell specials in the mornings. But just about everyone orders the combo pan roast, a supremely creamy and tomato-y concoction loaded with shrimp, crab and lobster, made in front of you in bubbling silver steam kettles. — AC

Spago at Bellagio

Wolfgang Puck, the catalyst for the celebrity chef boom in Las Vegas in the ’90s, has re-created the magic of the Beverly Hills Spago once again, this time at the Bellagio (the restaurant was in the Caesars Forum Shops from 1992 to 2018). Get the signature smoked salmon pizza, veal schnitzel and Chinois salad, all served with a complementary view of the Bellagio fountains. — JH

3600 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 693-8181, wolfgangpuck.com/dining/spago-lv

Carbone at Aria

The tableside Caesar salad is reason enough to visit. The dressing is anchovy-flecked perfection and the Lego-sized croutons are mini rectangles of fried dough that burst with garlic butter when you take a bite. The spicy rigatoni in pink sauce — and the rest of the very “Goodfellas” Italian-American menu — is just as good as at the original location in New York City. — JH

Bobby’s Burger Palace outside the Waldorf Astoria

Bobby Flay built his career on Southwestern flavors predictably, the green chili cheeseburger (with queso and pickled red onions) is one of the best burgers you can find on the Strip. Bobby’s is a casual, choose-your-own-burger adventure (beef, chicken, turkey) where you can add crushed potato chips to your burger for free. — JH

3750 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 598-0191, bobbysburgerpalace.com

Here are six great off-Strip places to help ensure you’re making the most of your time in Vegas.

Sadelle’s at Bellagio

The sumptuous sky-blue dining room at Sadelle’s is the place to be for a Fancy Event Brunch. Splash the pot and order the tower of smoked fish served with bagels stacked high like a ring toss for $125 get a delectable grapefruit cocktail, each triangle carved out and brûléed, for $14 add caviar to any dish for $60 a pop. A couple tips: Skip the line (often winding into Bellagio’s atrium) and snag a seat at the bar — and grab a crackly sticky bun from the pink pastry cart on the way out. — AC

Restaurant Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace

Guy Savoy has all the trappings you expect from a traditional super-luxe French restaurant: a wine tome that would buckle a card table, an army of doting servers, trolleys laden with breads and fussy desserts. Unfortunately, it all feels a bit uninspired and paint-by-numbers. Still, the white truffle risotto was almost worth the $140 supplementary charge and the A5 Wagyu-and-lobster combo was the consummate ideal of surf and turf. — AC

Bavette’s at Park MGM

The Vegas outlet of a French steakhouse from Chicago is ideal for a date: dark,moody, and romantic. The rib-eyes are rare, the wedge salads are ice-cold and the seafood towers will have other diners craning their necks.— JH

3770 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 730-6700, bavettessteakhouse.com/las-vegas

Tacos El Gordo

It’s a madhouse at the Strip outpost of Tacos El Gordo, where you line up for Tijuana-style tacos according to which meat you want. It’s not the most efficient process, but you won’t find a better adobada taco on a handmade corn tortilla at 4 a.m. — AC

3041 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 331-1160, tacoselgordobc.com

Joël Robuchon

You’ve won the jackpot and all that crazed screaming made you hungry. You will celebrate with a blowout meal at Joël Robuchon, from which, four hours later, you will emerge no longer famished — or wealthy. Yes, at $445 for the full degustation menu, it’s expensive. And yes, it’s worth it. It just feels right: the plush purple banquettes, the Baccarat crystal, the impeccable service, the … framed photo of Nicolas Cage? OK, maybe not that. Then there’s the food: indulgently overstuffed langoustine ravioli in foie gras sauce, Robuchon’s signature mashed potatoes and, naturally, a flawless chocolate souffle with the texture of the inside of a marshmallow just roasted on a campfire. If you’ve got money to roast, go for it. — AC and LKP

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon

If you didn’t do well enough at the tables to eat next door, L’Atelier is no mere consolation prize. The alarmingly red restaurant — barstools, water glasses, flowers, lighting — is an eye-catcher even through all the flashing neon on the casino floor. Sit at the counter and build your own prix fixe dinner. It’s unfussy, with food nearly as good as its extravagant sister restaurant. And the heavenly mashed potatoes are here, too. — AC


Las Vegas restaurants guide: Where to eat on and off the Strip

Whether you’re dining on the Strip or far away from it, in the mood to blow obscene amounts of money or looking for a quick and affordable meal, our dining guide will serve as a shining beacon, like the light on top of Luxor. We scoured the city for the best places to eat, drink, and then eat and drink some more. Because while you’re visiting Vegas, you know to abide by the maxim, “Everything in moderation, including moderation.”

Best Friend at the Park MGM

Roy Choi has translated the vibe of his Kogi BBQ food trucks into a bumping dining room with a DJ and craveable Korean menu filled with kimchi fried rice, kimchi jjigaen and sizzling platters of kalbi . Even if you’re not eating there, the entrance — a liquor store/bar full of Best Friend merch and boozy slushees — is worth popping into. — JH

Le Cirque at Bellagio

You’ll feel like you’re eating under the big top at Le Cirque, where the dining room is ringed by antiquated circus scenes and covered by a billowing purple-yellow-orange canopy. It comes off as opulent instead of campy, and playfully offsets the formal, rigorous French cuisine: Burgundy snails in black garlic herb butter veal sweetbreads sauteed foie gras, creme brûlée. Be sure to request a table with a view of the Bellagio fountains. — AC

All-you-can-eat buffets are the most American thing imaginable.

The Cosmopolitan

Pound for pound the Cosmopolitan houses the best food on the Strip. Highlights include dinner with a show at Rose Rabbit Lie, fried chicken at Momofuku, drippy egg sandwich at Eggslut, croquetas served in sneakers at Jose Andres’ Jaleo and literally everything at the Block 16 food hall (but especially Andy Ricker’s Pok Pok wings, all the sandwiches at Lardo and hot chicken from Hattie B’s). — JH

3708 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 698-7000, cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

Mott 32 at Palazzo

Don’t let the multiple elaborate dining rooms fool you. Mott 32 serves straight Chinese comfort food, including plates of soy sauce chow fun your Chinese grandmother would approve of. The superb Peking duck is marinated, then smoked, then roasted over applewood until the skin is brittle-crisp. — JH

3325 S. Las Vegas Blvd., #206, Las Vegas, (702) 607-3232, mott32.com/lasvegas

Mesa Grill at Caesars Palace

Bobby Flay’s Southwestern standby is the place to grab dinner before catching Mariah Carey at the Colosseum. This is fun, punchy, chili-fueled food meant for sharing: goat cheese queso fundido, red chili barbecue duck and a 22-ounce chipotle-glazed rib-eye. — JH

3570 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 731-7731, mesagrill.com

Oyster Bar at Palace Station

There are certain truths about Vegas: You will lose money over time and you will have to wait in a line that snakes past the slot machines for a seat at the Oyster Bar. The counter-only restaurant is open 24 hours, offering half-shell specials in the mornings. But just about everyone orders the combo pan roast, a supremely creamy and tomato-y concoction loaded with shrimp, crab and lobster, made in front of you in bubbling silver steam kettles. — AC

Spago at Bellagio

Wolfgang Puck, the catalyst for the celebrity chef boom in Las Vegas in the ’90s, has re-created the magic of the Beverly Hills Spago once again, this time at the Bellagio (the restaurant was in the Caesars Forum Shops from 1992 to 2018). Get the signature smoked salmon pizza, veal schnitzel and Chinois salad, all served with a complementary view of the Bellagio fountains. — JH

3600 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 693-8181, wolfgangpuck.com/dining/spago-lv

Carbone at Aria

The tableside Caesar salad is reason enough to visit. The dressing is anchovy-flecked perfection and the Lego-sized croutons are mini rectangles of fried dough that burst with garlic butter when you take a bite. The spicy rigatoni in pink sauce — and the rest of the very “Goodfellas” Italian-American menu — is just as good as at the original location in New York City. — JH

Bobby’s Burger Palace outside the Waldorf Astoria

Bobby Flay built his career on Southwestern flavors predictably, the green chili cheeseburger (with queso and pickled red onions) is one of the best burgers you can find on the Strip. Bobby’s is a casual, choose-your-own-burger adventure (beef, chicken, turkey) where you can add crushed potato chips to your burger for free. — JH

3750 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 598-0191, bobbysburgerpalace.com

Here are six great off-Strip places to help ensure you’re making the most of your time in Vegas.

Sadelle’s at Bellagio

The sumptuous sky-blue dining room at Sadelle’s is the place to be for a Fancy Event Brunch. Splash the pot and order the tower of smoked fish served with bagels stacked high like a ring toss for $125 get a delectable grapefruit cocktail, each triangle carved out and brûléed, for $14 add caviar to any dish for $60 a pop. A couple tips: Skip the line (often winding into Bellagio’s atrium) and snag a seat at the bar — and grab a crackly sticky bun from the pink pastry cart on the way out. — AC

Restaurant Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace

Guy Savoy has all the trappings you expect from a traditional super-luxe French restaurant: a wine tome that would buckle a card table, an army of doting servers, trolleys laden with breads and fussy desserts. Unfortunately, it all feels a bit uninspired and paint-by-numbers. Still, the white truffle risotto was almost worth the $140 supplementary charge and the A5 Wagyu-and-lobster combo was the consummate ideal of surf and turf. — AC

Bavette’s at Park MGM

The Vegas outlet of a French steakhouse from Chicago is ideal for a date: dark,moody, and romantic. The rib-eyes are rare, the wedge salads are ice-cold and the seafood towers will have other diners craning their necks.— JH

3770 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 730-6700, bavettessteakhouse.com/las-vegas

Tacos El Gordo

It’s a madhouse at the Strip outpost of Tacos El Gordo, where you line up for Tijuana-style tacos according to which meat you want. It’s not the most efficient process, but you won’t find a better adobada taco on a handmade corn tortilla at 4 a.m. — AC

3041 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 331-1160, tacoselgordobc.com

Joël Robuchon

You’ve won the jackpot and all that crazed screaming made you hungry. You will celebrate with a blowout meal at Joël Robuchon, from which, four hours later, you will emerge no longer famished — or wealthy. Yes, at $445 for the full degustation menu, it’s expensive. And yes, it’s worth it. It just feels right: the plush purple banquettes, the Baccarat crystal, the impeccable service, the … framed photo of Nicolas Cage? OK, maybe not that. Then there’s the food: indulgently overstuffed langoustine ravioli in foie gras sauce, Robuchon’s signature mashed potatoes and, naturally, a flawless chocolate souffle with the texture of the inside of a marshmallow just roasted on a campfire. If you’ve got money to roast, go for it. — AC and LKP

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon

If you didn’t do well enough at the tables to eat next door, L’Atelier is no mere consolation prize. The alarmingly red restaurant — barstools, water glasses, flowers, lighting — is an eye-catcher even through all the flashing neon on the casino floor. Sit at the counter and build your own prix fixe dinner. It’s unfussy, with food nearly as good as its extravagant sister restaurant. And the heavenly mashed potatoes are here, too. — AC


Las Vegas restaurants guide: Where to eat on and off the Strip

Whether you’re dining on the Strip or far away from it, in the mood to blow obscene amounts of money or looking for a quick and affordable meal, our dining guide will serve as a shining beacon, like the light on top of Luxor. We scoured the city for the best places to eat, drink, and then eat and drink some more. Because while you’re visiting Vegas, you know to abide by the maxim, “Everything in moderation, including moderation.”

Best Friend at the Park MGM

Roy Choi has translated the vibe of his Kogi BBQ food trucks into a bumping dining room with a DJ and craveable Korean menu filled with kimchi fried rice, kimchi jjigaen and sizzling platters of kalbi . Even if you’re not eating there, the entrance — a liquor store/bar full of Best Friend merch and boozy slushees — is worth popping into. — JH

Le Cirque at Bellagio

You’ll feel like you’re eating under the big top at Le Cirque, where the dining room is ringed by antiquated circus scenes and covered by a billowing purple-yellow-orange canopy. It comes off as opulent instead of campy, and playfully offsets the formal, rigorous French cuisine: Burgundy snails in black garlic herb butter veal sweetbreads sauteed foie gras, creme brûlée. Be sure to request a table with a view of the Bellagio fountains. — AC

All-you-can-eat buffets are the most American thing imaginable.

The Cosmopolitan

Pound for pound the Cosmopolitan houses the best food on the Strip. Highlights include dinner with a show at Rose Rabbit Lie, fried chicken at Momofuku, drippy egg sandwich at Eggslut, croquetas served in sneakers at Jose Andres’ Jaleo and literally everything at the Block 16 food hall (but especially Andy Ricker’s Pok Pok wings, all the sandwiches at Lardo and hot chicken from Hattie B’s). — JH

3708 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 698-7000, cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

Mott 32 at Palazzo

Don’t let the multiple elaborate dining rooms fool you. Mott 32 serves straight Chinese comfort food, including plates of soy sauce chow fun your Chinese grandmother would approve of. The superb Peking duck is marinated, then smoked, then roasted over applewood until the skin is brittle-crisp. — JH

3325 S. Las Vegas Blvd., #206, Las Vegas, (702) 607-3232, mott32.com/lasvegas

Mesa Grill at Caesars Palace

Bobby Flay’s Southwestern standby is the place to grab dinner before catching Mariah Carey at the Colosseum. This is fun, punchy, chili-fueled food meant for sharing: goat cheese queso fundido, red chili barbecue duck and a 22-ounce chipotle-glazed rib-eye. — JH

3570 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 731-7731, mesagrill.com

Oyster Bar at Palace Station

There are certain truths about Vegas: You will lose money over time and you will have to wait in a line that snakes past the slot machines for a seat at the Oyster Bar. The counter-only restaurant is open 24 hours, offering half-shell specials in the mornings. But just about everyone orders the combo pan roast, a supremely creamy and tomato-y concoction loaded with shrimp, crab and lobster, made in front of you in bubbling silver steam kettles. — AC

Spago at Bellagio

Wolfgang Puck, the catalyst for the celebrity chef boom in Las Vegas in the ’90s, has re-created the magic of the Beverly Hills Spago once again, this time at the Bellagio (the restaurant was in the Caesars Forum Shops from 1992 to 2018). Get the signature smoked salmon pizza, veal schnitzel and Chinois salad, all served with a complementary view of the Bellagio fountains. — JH

3600 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 693-8181, wolfgangpuck.com/dining/spago-lv

Carbone at Aria

The tableside Caesar salad is reason enough to visit. The dressing is anchovy-flecked perfection and the Lego-sized croutons are mini rectangles of fried dough that burst with garlic butter when you take a bite. The spicy rigatoni in pink sauce — and the rest of the very “Goodfellas” Italian-American menu — is just as good as at the original location in New York City. — JH

Bobby’s Burger Palace outside the Waldorf Astoria

Bobby Flay built his career on Southwestern flavors predictably, the green chili cheeseburger (with queso and pickled red onions) is one of the best burgers you can find on the Strip. Bobby’s is a casual, choose-your-own-burger adventure (beef, chicken, turkey) where you can add crushed potato chips to your burger for free. — JH

3750 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 598-0191, bobbysburgerpalace.com

Here are six great off-Strip places to help ensure you’re making the most of your time in Vegas.

Sadelle’s at Bellagio

The sumptuous sky-blue dining room at Sadelle’s is the place to be for a Fancy Event Brunch. Splash the pot and order the tower of smoked fish served with bagels stacked high like a ring toss for $125 get a delectable grapefruit cocktail, each triangle carved out and brûléed, for $14 add caviar to any dish for $60 a pop. A couple tips: Skip the line (often winding into Bellagio’s atrium) and snag a seat at the bar — and grab a crackly sticky bun from the pink pastry cart on the way out. — AC

Restaurant Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace

Guy Savoy has all the trappings you expect from a traditional super-luxe French restaurant: a wine tome that would buckle a card table, an army of doting servers, trolleys laden with breads and fussy desserts. Unfortunately, it all feels a bit uninspired and paint-by-numbers. Still, the white truffle risotto was almost worth the $140 supplementary charge and the A5 Wagyu-and-lobster combo was the consummate ideal of surf and turf. — AC

Bavette’s at Park MGM

The Vegas outlet of a French steakhouse from Chicago is ideal for a date: dark,moody, and romantic. The rib-eyes are rare, the wedge salads are ice-cold and the seafood towers will have other diners craning their necks.— JH

3770 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 730-6700, bavettessteakhouse.com/las-vegas

Tacos El Gordo

It’s a madhouse at the Strip outpost of Tacos El Gordo, where you line up for Tijuana-style tacos according to which meat you want. It’s not the most efficient process, but you won’t find a better adobada taco on a handmade corn tortilla at 4 a.m. — AC

3041 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 331-1160, tacoselgordobc.com

Joël Robuchon

You’ve won the jackpot and all that crazed screaming made you hungry. You will celebrate with a blowout meal at Joël Robuchon, from which, four hours later, you will emerge no longer famished — or wealthy. Yes, at $445 for the full degustation menu, it’s expensive. And yes, it’s worth it. It just feels right: the plush purple banquettes, the Baccarat crystal, the impeccable service, the … framed photo of Nicolas Cage? OK, maybe not that. Then there’s the food: indulgently overstuffed langoustine ravioli in foie gras sauce, Robuchon’s signature mashed potatoes and, naturally, a flawless chocolate souffle with the texture of the inside of a marshmallow just roasted on a campfire. If you’ve got money to roast, go for it. — AC and LKP

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon

If you didn’t do well enough at the tables to eat next door, L’Atelier is no mere consolation prize. The alarmingly red restaurant — barstools, water glasses, flowers, lighting — is an eye-catcher even through all the flashing neon on the casino floor. Sit at the counter and build your own prix fixe dinner. It’s unfussy, with food nearly as good as its extravagant sister restaurant. And the heavenly mashed potatoes are here, too. — AC


Las Vegas restaurants guide: Where to eat on and off the Strip

Whether you’re dining on the Strip or far away from it, in the mood to blow obscene amounts of money or looking for a quick and affordable meal, our dining guide will serve as a shining beacon, like the light on top of Luxor. We scoured the city for the best places to eat, drink, and then eat and drink some more. Because while you’re visiting Vegas, you know to abide by the maxim, “Everything in moderation, including moderation.”

Best Friend at the Park MGM

Roy Choi has translated the vibe of his Kogi BBQ food trucks into a bumping dining room with a DJ and craveable Korean menu filled with kimchi fried rice, kimchi jjigaen and sizzling platters of kalbi . Even if you’re not eating there, the entrance — a liquor store/bar full of Best Friend merch and boozy slushees — is worth popping into. — JH

Le Cirque at Bellagio

You’ll feel like you’re eating under the big top at Le Cirque, where the dining room is ringed by antiquated circus scenes and covered by a billowing purple-yellow-orange canopy. It comes off as opulent instead of campy, and playfully offsets the formal, rigorous French cuisine: Burgundy snails in black garlic herb butter veal sweetbreads sauteed foie gras, creme brûlée. Be sure to request a table with a view of the Bellagio fountains. — AC

All-you-can-eat buffets are the most American thing imaginable.

The Cosmopolitan

Pound for pound the Cosmopolitan houses the best food on the Strip. Highlights include dinner with a show at Rose Rabbit Lie, fried chicken at Momofuku, drippy egg sandwich at Eggslut, croquetas served in sneakers at Jose Andres’ Jaleo and literally everything at the Block 16 food hall (but especially Andy Ricker’s Pok Pok wings, all the sandwiches at Lardo and hot chicken from Hattie B’s). — JH

3708 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 698-7000, cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

Mott 32 at Palazzo

Don’t let the multiple elaborate dining rooms fool you. Mott 32 serves straight Chinese comfort food, including plates of soy sauce chow fun your Chinese grandmother would approve of. The superb Peking duck is marinated, then smoked, then roasted over applewood until the skin is brittle-crisp. — JH

3325 S. Las Vegas Blvd., #206, Las Vegas, (702) 607-3232, mott32.com/lasvegas

Mesa Grill at Caesars Palace

Bobby Flay’s Southwestern standby is the place to grab dinner before catching Mariah Carey at the Colosseum. This is fun, punchy, chili-fueled food meant for sharing: goat cheese queso fundido, red chili barbecue duck and a 22-ounce chipotle-glazed rib-eye. — JH

3570 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 731-7731, mesagrill.com

Oyster Bar at Palace Station

There are certain truths about Vegas: You will lose money over time and you will have to wait in a line that snakes past the slot machines for a seat at the Oyster Bar. The counter-only restaurant is open 24 hours, offering half-shell specials in the mornings. But just about everyone orders the combo pan roast, a supremely creamy and tomato-y concoction loaded with shrimp, crab and lobster, made in front of you in bubbling silver steam kettles. — AC

Spago at Bellagio

Wolfgang Puck, the catalyst for the celebrity chef boom in Las Vegas in the ’90s, has re-created the magic of the Beverly Hills Spago once again, this time at the Bellagio (the restaurant was in the Caesars Forum Shops from 1992 to 2018). Get the signature smoked salmon pizza, veal schnitzel and Chinois salad, all served with a complementary view of the Bellagio fountains. — JH

3600 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 693-8181, wolfgangpuck.com/dining/spago-lv

Carbone at Aria

The tableside Caesar salad is reason enough to visit. The dressing is anchovy-flecked perfection and the Lego-sized croutons are mini rectangles of fried dough that burst with garlic butter when you take a bite. The spicy rigatoni in pink sauce — and the rest of the very “Goodfellas” Italian-American menu — is just as good as at the original location in New York City. — JH

Bobby’s Burger Palace outside the Waldorf Astoria

Bobby Flay built his career on Southwestern flavors predictably, the green chili cheeseburger (with queso and pickled red onions) is one of the best burgers you can find on the Strip. Bobby’s is a casual, choose-your-own-burger adventure (beef, chicken, turkey) where you can add crushed potato chips to your burger for free. — JH

3750 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 598-0191, bobbysburgerpalace.com

Here are six great off-Strip places to help ensure you’re making the most of your time in Vegas.

Sadelle’s at Bellagio

The sumptuous sky-blue dining room at Sadelle’s is the place to be for a Fancy Event Brunch. Splash the pot and order the tower of smoked fish served with bagels stacked high like a ring toss for $125 get a delectable grapefruit cocktail, each triangle carved out and brûléed, for $14 add caviar to any dish for $60 a pop. A couple tips: Skip the line (often winding into Bellagio’s atrium) and snag a seat at the bar — and grab a crackly sticky bun from the pink pastry cart on the way out. — AC

Restaurant Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace

Guy Savoy has all the trappings you expect from a traditional super-luxe French restaurant: a wine tome that would buckle a card table, an army of doting servers, trolleys laden with breads and fussy desserts. Unfortunately, it all feels a bit uninspired and paint-by-numbers. Still, the white truffle risotto was almost worth the $140 supplementary charge and the A5 Wagyu-and-lobster combo was the consummate ideal of surf and turf. — AC

Bavette’s at Park MGM

The Vegas outlet of a French steakhouse from Chicago is ideal for a date: dark,moody, and romantic. The rib-eyes are rare, the wedge salads are ice-cold and the seafood towers will have other diners craning their necks.— JH

3770 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 730-6700, bavettessteakhouse.com/las-vegas

Tacos El Gordo

It’s a madhouse at the Strip outpost of Tacos El Gordo, where you line up for Tijuana-style tacos according to which meat you want. It’s not the most efficient process, but you won’t find a better adobada taco on a handmade corn tortilla at 4 a.m. — AC

3041 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 331-1160, tacoselgordobc.com

Joël Robuchon

You’ve won the jackpot and all that crazed screaming made you hungry. You will celebrate with a blowout meal at Joël Robuchon, from which, four hours later, you will emerge no longer famished — or wealthy. Yes, at $445 for the full degustation menu, it’s expensive. And yes, it’s worth it. It just feels right: the plush purple banquettes, the Baccarat crystal, the impeccable service, the … framed photo of Nicolas Cage? OK, maybe not that. Then there’s the food: indulgently overstuffed langoustine ravioli in foie gras sauce, Robuchon’s signature mashed potatoes and, naturally, a flawless chocolate souffle with the texture of the inside of a marshmallow just roasted on a campfire. If you’ve got money to roast, go for it. — AC and LKP

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon

If you didn’t do well enough at the tables to eat next door, L’Atelier is no mere consolation prize. The alarmingly red restaurant — barstools, water glasses, flowers, lighting — is an eye-catcher even through all the flashing neon on the casino floor. Sit at the counter and build your own prix fixe dinner. It’s unfussy, with food nearly as good as its extravagant sister restaurant. And the heavenly mashed potatoes are here, too. — AC


Las Vegas restaurants guide: Where to eat on and off the Strip

Whether you’re dining on the Strip or far away from it, in the mood to blow obscene amounts of money or looking for a quick and affordable meal, our dining guide will serve as a shining beacon, like the light on top of Luxor. We scoured the city for the best places to eat, drink, and then eat and drink some more. Because while you’re visiting Vegas, you know to abide by the maxim, “Everything in moderation, including moderation.”

Best Friend at the Park MGM

Roy Choi has translated the vibe of his Kogi BBQ food trucks into a bumping dining room with a DJ and craveable Korean menu filled with kimchi fried rice, kimchi jjigaen and sizzling platters of kalbi . Even if you’re not eating there, the entrance — a liquor store/bar full of Best Friend merch and boozy slushees — is worth popping into. — JH

Le Cirque at Bellagio

You’ll feel like you’re eating under the big top at Le Cirque, where the dining room is ringed by antiquated circus scenes and covered by a billowing purple-yellow-orange canopy. It comes off as opulent instead of campy, and playfully offsets the formal, rigorous French cuisine: Burgundy snails in black garlic herb butter veal sweetbreads sauteed foie gras, creme brûlée. Be sure to request a table with a view of the Bellagio fountains. — AC

All-you-can-eat buffets are the most American thing imaginable.

The Cosmopolitan

Pound for pound the Cosmopolitan houses the best food on the Strip. Highlights include dinner with a show at Rose Rabbit Lie, fried chicken at Momofuku, drippy egg sandwich at Eggslut, croquetas served in sneakers at Jose Andres’ Jaleo and literally everything at the Block 16 food hall (but especially Andy Ricker’s Pok Pok wings, all the sandwiches at Lardo and hot chicken from Hattie B’s). — JH

3708 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 698-7000, cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

Mott 32 at Palazzo

Don’t let the multiple elaborate dining rooms fool you. Mott 32 serves straight Chinese comfort food, including plates of soy sauce chow fun your Chinese grandmother would approve of. The superb Peking duck is marinated, then smoked, then roasted over applewood until the skin is brittle-crisp. — JH

3325 S. Las Vegas Blvd., #206, Las Vegas, (702) 607-3232, mott32.com/lasvegas

Mesa Grill at Caesars Palace

Bobby Flay’s Southwestern standby is the place to grab dinner before catching Mariah Carey at the Colosseum. This is fun, punchy, chili-fueled food meant for sharing: goat cheese queso fundido, red chili barbecue duck and a 22-ounce chipotle-glazed rib-eye. — JH

3570 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 731-7731, mesagrill.com

Oyster Bar at Palace Station

There are certain truths about Vegas: You will lose money over time and you will have to wait in a line that snakes past the slot machines for a seat at the Oyster Bar. The counter-only restaurant is open 24 hours, offering half-shell specials in the mornings. But just about everyone orders the combo pan roast, a supremely creamy and tomato-y concoction loaded with shrimp, crab and lobster, made in front of you in bubbling silver steam kettles. — AC

Spago at Bellagio

Wolfgang Puck, the catalyst for the celebrity chef boom in Las Vegas in the ’90s, has re-created the magic of the Beverly Hills Spago once again, this time at the Bellagio (the restaurant was in the Caesars Forum Shops from 1992 to 2018). Get the signature smoked salmon pizza, veal schnitzel and Chinois salad, all served with a complementary view of the Bellagio fountains. — JH

3600 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 693-8181, wolfgangpuck.com/dining/spago-lv

Carbone at Aria

The tableside Caesar salad is reason enough to visit. The dressing is anchovy-flecked perfection and the Lego-sized croutons are mini rectangles of fried dough that burst with garlic butter when you take a bite. The spicy rigatoni in pink sauce — and the rest of the very “Goodfellas” Italian-American menu — is just as good as at the original location in New York City. — JH

Bobby’s Burger Palace outside the Waldorf Astoria

Bobby Flay built his career on Southwestern flavors predictably, the green chili cheeseburger (with queso and pickled red onions) is one of the best burgers you can find on the Strip. Bobby’s is a casual, choose-your-own-burger adventure (beef, chicken, turkey) where you can add crushed potato chips to your burger for free. — JH

3750 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 598-0191, bobbysburgerpalace.com

Here are six great off-Strip places to help ensure you’re making the most of your time in Vegas.

Sadelle’s at Bellagio

The sumptuous sky-blue dining room at Sadelle’s is the place to be for a Fancy Event Brunch. Splash the pot and order the tower of smoked fish served with bagels stacked high like a ring toss for $125 get a delectable grapefruit cocktail, each triangle carved out and brûléed, for $14 add caviar to any dish for $60 a pop. A couple tips: Skip the line (often winding into Bellagio’s atrium) and snag a seat at the bar — and grab a crackly sticky bun from the pink pastry cart on the way out. — AC

Restaurant Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace

Guy Savoy has all the trappings you expect from a traditional super-luxe French restaurant: a wine tome that would buckle a card table, an army of doting servers, trolleys laden with breads and fussy desserts. Unfortunately, it all feels a bit uninspired and paint-by-numbers. Still, the white truffle risotto was almost worth the $140 supplementary charge and the A5 Wagyu-and-lobster combo was the consummate ideal of surf and turf. — AC

Bavette’s at Park MGM

The Vegas outlet of a French steakhouse from Chicago is ideal for a date: dark,moody, and romantic. The rib-eyes are rare, the wedge salads are ice-cold and the seafood towers will have other diners craning their necks.— JH

3770 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 730-6700, bavettessteakhouse.com/las-vegas

Tacos El Gordo

It’s a madhouse at the Strip outpost of Tacos El Gordo, where you line up for Tijuana-style tacos according to which meat you want. It’s not the most efficient process, but you won’t find a better adobada taco on a handmade corn tortilla at 4 a.m. — AC

3041 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 331-1160, tacoselgordobc.com

Joël Robuchon

You’ve won the jackpot and all that crazed screaming made you hungry. You will celebrate with a blowout meal at Joël Robuchon, from which, four hours later, you will emerge no longer famished — or wealthy. Yes, at $445 for the full degustation menu, it’s expensive. And yes, it’s worth it. It just feels right: the plush purple banquettes, the Baccarat crystal, the impeccable service, the … framed photo of Nicolas Cage? OK, maybe not that. Then there’s the food: indulgently overstuffed langoustine ravioli in foie gras sauce, Robuchon’s signature mashed potatoes and, naturally, a flawless chocolate souffle with the texture of the inside of a marshmallow just roasted on a campfire. If you’ve got money to roast, go for it. — AC and LKP

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon

If you didn’t do well enough at the tables to eat next door, L’Atelier is no mere consolation prize. The alarmingly red restaurant — barstools, water glasses, flowers, lighting — is an eye-catcher even through all the flashing neon on the casino floor. Sit at the counter and build your own prix fixe dinner. It’s unfussy, with food nearly as good as its extravagant sister restaurant. And the heavenly mashed potatoes are here, too. — AC


Las Vegas restaurants guide: Where to eat on and off the Strip

Whether you’re dining on the Strip or far away from it, in the mood to blow obscene amounts of money or looking for a quick and affordable meal, our dining guide will serve as a shining beacon, like the light on top of Luxor. We scoured the city for the best places to eat, drink, and then eat and drink some more. Because while you’re visiting Vegas, you know to abide by the maxim, “Everything in moderation, including moderation.”

Best Friend at the Park MGM

Roy Choi has translated the vibe of his Kogi BBQ food trucks into a bumping dining room with a DJ and craveable Korean menu filled with kimchi fried rice, kimchi jjigaen and sizzling platters of kalbi . Even if you’re not eating there, the entrance — a liquor store/bar full of Best Friend merch and boozy slushees — is worth popping into. — JH

Le Cirque at Bellagio

You’ll feel like you’re eating under the big top at Le Cirque, where the dining room is ringed by antiquated circus scenes and covered by a billowing purple-yellow-orange canopy. It comes off as opulent instead of campy, and playfully offsets the formal, rigorous French cuisine: Burgundy snails in black garlic herb butter veal sweetbreads sauteed foie gras, creme brûlée. Be sure to request a table with a view of the Bellagio fountains. — AC

All-you-can-eat buffets are the most American thing imaginable.

The Cosmopolitan

Pound for pound the Cosmopolitan houses the best food on the Strip. Highlights include dinner with a show at Rose Rabbit Lie, fried chicken at Momofuku, drippy egg sandwich at Eggslut, croquetas served in sneakers at Jose Andres’ Jaleo and literally everything at the Block 16 food hall (but especially Andy Ricker’s Pok Pok wings, all the sandwiches at Lardo and hot chicken from Hattie B’s). — JH

3708 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 698-7000, cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

Mott 32 at Palazzo

Don’t let the multiple elaborate dining rooms fool you. Mott 32 serves straight Chinese comfort food, including plates of soy sauce chow fun your Chinese grandmother would approve of. The superb Peking duck is marinated, then smoked, then roasted over applewood until the skin is brittle-crisp. — JH

3325 S. Las Vegas Blvd., #206, Las Vegas, (702) 607-3232, mott32.com/lasvegas

Mesa Grill at Caesars Palace

Bobby Flay’s Southwestern standby is the place to grab dinner before catching Mariah Carey at the Colosseum. This is fun, punchy, chili-fueled food meant for sharing: goat cheese queso fundido, red chili barbecue duck and a 22-ounce chipotle-glazed rib-eye. — JH

3570 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 731-7731, mesagrill.com

Oyster Bar at Palace Station

There are certain truths about Vegas: You will lose money over time and you will have to wait in a line that snakes past the slot machines for a seat at the Oyster Bar. The counter-only restaurant is open 24 hours, offering half-shell specials in the mornings. But just about everyone orders the combo pan roast, a supremely creamy and tomato-y concoction loaded with shrimp, crab and lobster, made in front of you in bubbling silver steam kettles. — AC

Spago at Bellagio

Wolfgang Puck, the catalyst for the celebrity chef boom in Las Vegas in the ’90s, has re-created the magic of the Beverly Hills Spago once again, this time at the Bellagio (the restaurant was in the Caesars Forum Shops from 1992 to 2018). Get the signature smoked salmon pizza, veal schnitzel and Chinois salad, all served with a complementary view of the Bellagio fountains. — JH

3600 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 693-8181, wolfgangpuck.com/dining/spago-lv

Carbone at Aria

The tableside Caesar salad is reason enough to visit. The dressing is anchovy-flecked perfection and the Lego-sized croutons are mini rectangles of fried dough that burst with garlic butter when you take a bite. The spicy rigatoni in pink sauce — and the rest of the very “Goodfellas” Italian-American menu — is just as good as at the original location in New York City. — JH

Bobby’s Burger Palace outside the Waldorf Astoria

Bobby Flay built his career on Southwestern flavors predictably, the green chili cheeseburger (with queso and pickled red onions) is one of the best burgers you can find on the Strip. Bobby’s is a casual, choose-your-own-burger adventure (beef, chicken, turkey) where you can add crushed potato chips to your burger for free. — JH

3750 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 598-0191, bobbysburgerpalace.com

Here are six great off-Strip places to help ensure you’re making the most of your time in Vegas.

Sadelle’s at Bellagio

The sumptuous sky-blue dining room at Sadelle’s is the place to be for a Fancy Event Brunch. Splash the pot and order the tower of smoked fish served with bagels stacked high like a ring toss for $125 get a delectable grapefruit cocktail, each triangle carved out and brûléed, for $14 add caviar to any dish for $60 a pop. A couple tips: Skip the line (often winding into Bellagio’s atrium) and snag a seat at the bar — and grab a crackly sticky bun from the pink pastry cart on the way out. — AC

Restaurant Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace

Guy Savoy has all the trappings you expect from a traditional super-luxe French restaurant: a wine tome that would buckle a card table, an army of doting servers, trolleys laden with breads and fussy desserts. Unfortunately, it all feels a bit uninspired and paint-by-numbers. Still, the white truffle risotto was almost worth the $140 supplementary charge and the A5 Wagyu-and-lobster combo was the consummate ideal of surf and turf. — AC

Bavette’s at Park MGM

The Vegas outlet of a French steakhouse from Chicago is ideal for a date: dark,moody, and romantic. The rib-eyes are rare, the wedge salads are ice-cold and the seafood towers will have other diners craning their necks.— JH

3770 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 730-6700, bavettessteakhouse.com/las-vegas

Tacos El Gordo

It’s a madhouse at the Strip outpost of Tacos El Gordo, where you line up for Tijuana-style tacos according to which meat you want. It’s not the most efficient process, but you won’t find a better adobada taco on a handmade corn tortilla at 4 a.m. — AC

3041 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 331-1160, tacoselgordobc.com

Joël Robuchon

You’ve won the jackpot and all that crazed screaming made you hungry. You will celebrate with a blowout meal at Joël Robuchon, from which, four hours later, you will emerge no longer famished — or wealthy. Yes, at $445 for the full degustation menu, it’s expensive. And yes, it’s worth it. It just feels right: the plush purple banquettes, the Baccarat crystal, the impeccable service, the … framed photo of Nicolas Cage? OK, maybe not that. Then there’s the food: indulgently overstuffed langoustine ravioli in foie gras sauce, Robuchon’s signature mashed potatoes and, naturally, a flawless chocolate souffle with the texture of the inside of a marshmallow just roasted on a campfire. If you’ve got money to roast, go for it. — AC and LKP

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon

If you didn’t do well enough at the tables to eat next door, L’Atelier is no mere consolation prize. The alarmingly red restaurant — barstools, water glasses, flowers, lighting — is an eye-catcher even through all the flashing neon on the casino floor. Sit at the counter and build your own prix fixe dinner. It’s unfussy, with food nearly as good as its extravagant sister restaurant. And the heavenly mashed potatoes are here, too. — AC


Las Vegas restaurants guide: Where to eat on and off the Strip

Whether you’re dining on the Strip or far away from it, in the mood to blow obscene amounts of money or looking for a quick and affordable meal, our dining guide will serve as a shining beacon, like the light on top of Luxor. We scoured the city for the best places to eat, drink, and then eat and drink some more. Because while you’re visiting Vegas, you know to abide by the maxim, “Everything in moderation, including moderation.”

Best Friend at the Park MGM

Roy Choi has translated the vibe of his Kogi BBQ food trucks into a bumping dining room with a DJ and craveable Korean menu filled with kimchi fried rice, kimchi jjigaen and sizzling platters of kalbi . Even if you’re not eating there, the entrance — a liquor store/bar full of Best Friend merch and boozy slushees — is worth popping into. — JH

Le Cirque at Bellagio

You’ll feel like you’re eating under the big top at Le Cirque, where the dining room is ringed by antiquated circus scenes and covered by a billowing purple-yellow-orange canopy. It comes off as opulent instead of campy, and playfully offsets the formal, rigorous French cuisine: Burgundy snails in black garlic herb butter veal sweetbreads sauteed foie gras, creme brûlée. Be sure to request a table with a view of the Bellagio fountains. — AC

All-you-can-eat buffets are the most American thing imaginable.

The Cosmopolitan

Pound for pound the Cosmopolitan houses the best food on the Strip. Highlights include dinner with a show at Rose Rabbit Lie, fried chicken at Momofuku, drippy egg sandwich at Eggslut, croquetas served in sneakers at Jose Andres’ Jaleo and literally everything at the Block 16 food hall (but especially Andy Ricker’s Pok Pok wings, all the sandwiches at Lardo and hot chicken from Hattie B’s). — JH

3708 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 698-7000, cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

Mott 32 at Palazzo

Don’t let the multiple elaborate dining rooms fool you. Mott 32 serves straight Chinese comfort food, including plates of soy sauce chow fun your Chinese grandmother would approve of. The superb Peking duck is marinated, then smoked, then roasted over applewood until the skin is brittle-crisp. — JH

3325 S. Las Vegas Blvd., #206, Las Vegas, (702) 607-3232, mott32.com/lasvegas

Mesa Grill at Caesars Palace

Bobby Flay’s Southwestern standby is the place to grab dinner before catching Mariah Carey at the Colosseum. This is fun, punchy, chili-fueled food meant for sharing: goat cheese queso fundido, red chili barbecue duck and a 22-ounce chipotle-glazed rib-eye. — JH

3570 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 731-7731, mesagrill.com

Oyster Bar at Palace Station

There are certain truths about Vegas: You will lose money over time and you will have to wait in a line that snakes past the slot machines for a seat at the Oyster Bar. The counter-only restaurant is open 24 hours, offering half-shell specials in the mornings. But just about everyone orders the combo pan roast, a supremely creamy and tomato-y concoction loaded with shrimp, crab and lobster, made in front of you in bubbling silver steam kettles. — AC

Spago at Bellagio

Wolfgang Puck, the catalyst for the celebrity chef boom in Las Vegas in the ’90s, has re-created the magic of the Beverly Hills Spago once again, this time at the Bellagio (the restaurant was in the Caesars Forum Shops from 1992 to 2018). Get the signature smoked salmon pizza, veal schnitzel and Chinois salad, all served with a complementary view of the Bellagio fountains. — JH

3600 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 693-8181, wolfgangpuck.com/dining/spago-lv

Carbone at Aria

The tableside Caesar salad is reason enough to visit. The dressing is anchovy-flecked perfection and the Lego-sized croutons are mini rectangles of fried dough that burst with garlic butter when you take a bite. The spicy rigatoni in pink sauce — and the rest of the very “Goodfellas” Italian-American menu — is just as good as at the original location in New York City. — JH

Bobby’s Burger Palace outside the Waldorf Astoria

Bobby Flay built his career on Southwestern flavors predictably, the green chili cheeseburger (with queso and pickled red onions) is one of the best burgers you can find on the Strip. Bobby’s is a casual, choose-your-own-burger adventure (beef, chicken, turkey) where you can add crushed potato chips to your burger for free. — JH

3750 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 598-0191, bobbysburgerpalace.com

Here are six great off-Strip places to help ensure you’re making the most of your time in Vegas.

Sadelle’s at Bellagio

The sumptuous sky-blue dining room at Sadelle’s is the place to be for a Fancy Event Brunch. Splash the pot and order the tower of smoked fish served with bagels stacked high like a ring toss for $125 get a delectable grapefruit cocktail, each triangle carved out and brûléed, for $14 add caviar to any dish for $60 a pop. A couple tips: Skip the line (often winding into Bellagio’s atrium) and snag a seat at the bar — and grab a crackly sticky bun from the pink pastry cart on the way out. — AC

Restaurant Guy Savoy at Caesars Palace

Guy Savoy has all the trappings you expect from a traditional super-luxe French restaurant: a wine tome that would buckle a card table, an army of doting servers, trolleys laden with breads and fussy desserts. Unfortunately, it all feels a bit uninspired and paint-by-numbers. Still, the white truffle risotto was almost worth the $140 supplementary charge and the A5 Wagyu-and-lobster combo was the consummate ideal of surf and turf. — AC

Bavette’s at Park MGM

The Vegas outlet of a French steakhouse from Chicago is ideal for a date: dark,moody, and romantic. The rib-eyes are rare, the wedge salads are ice-cold and the seafood towers will have other diners craning their necks.— JH

3770 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 730-6700, bavettessteakhouse.com/las-vegas

Tacos El Gordo

It’s a madhouse at the Strip outpost of Tacos El Gordo, where you line up for Tijuana-style tacos according to which meat you want. It’s not the most efficient process, but you won’t find a better adobada taco on a handmade corn tortilla at 4 a.m. — AC

3041 S. Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, (702) 331-1160, tacoselgordobc.com

Joël Robuchon

You’ve won the jackpot and all that crazed screaming made you hungry. You will celebrate with a blowout meal at Joël Robuchon, from which, four hours later, you will emerge no longer famished — or wealthy. Yes, at $445 for the full degustation menu, it’s expensive. And yes, it’s worth it. It just feels right: the plush purple banquettes, the Baccarat crystal, the impeccable service, the … framed photo of Nicolas Cage? OK, maybe not that. Then there’s the food: indulgently overstuffed langoustine ravioli in foie gras sauce, Robuchon’s signature mashed potatoes and, naturally, a flawless chocolate souffle with the texture of the inside of a marshmallow just roasted on a campfire. If you’ve got money to roast, go for it. — AC and LKP

L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon

If you didn’t do well enough at the tables to eat next door, L’Atelier is no mere consolation prize. The alarmingly red restaurant — barstools, water glasses, flowers, lighting — is an eye-catcher even through all the flashing neon on the casino floor. Sit at the counter and build your own prix fixe dinner. It’s unfussy, with food nearly as good as its extravagant sister restaurant. And the heavenly mashed potatoes are here, too. — AC


Watch the video: Best Casual Dining in Las Vegas. Our Top Favorite Affordable Food and Restaurant Experiences (June 2022).


Comments:

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  3. Lothar

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