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Why Is My Skin Orange? And Other Weird Food Side Effects

Why Is My Skin Orange? And Other Weird Food Side Effects


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Science: It’s what’s for dinner

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The lycopene that give tomatoes their glowing red skin will give you glowing orange skin if you eat too many. Even if you’re not eating crazy amounts of tomatoes, just eating a couple a day (or downing a lot of V8) can actually slightly alter your skin town.

Soy Can Decrease Sperm Count

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A recent fertility study found that men who frequently ate foods high in soy had a lower (though still normal) sperm count than men who rarely or never ate soy foods.

Carrots Can Turn Your Skin Orange

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Your grandma was right; the vitamin A in carrots really does help your vision. However, slamming back too much carrot juice or taking more beta-carotene supplements than the daily recommended allowance may turn your skin an orangey-yellow (more intense than the slight, healthy-looking yellow tint of a balanced diet), a condition called carotenosis.

And So Can Tomatoes

iStock/Thinkstock

The lycopene that give tomatoes their glowing red skin will give you glowing orange skin if you eat too many. Even if you’re not eating crazy amounts of tomatoes, just eating a couple a day (or downing a lot of V8) can actually slightly alter your skin town.

Trans Fats Make You Mean

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A UC San Diego study found links between diets high in trans fats, like those found in margarine or shortenings, and irritability along with aggressive behavior. Yikes.

Undercooked Mushrooms Can Cause a Rash

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Undercooking shiitake mushrooms leaves a starch-like substance in the mushrooms called lentinan that can sometimes cause a pretty unsightly rash all over the bodies of people who are sensitive to the protein. Fully cooking shiitakes will prevent the reaction.

Nutmeg Can Cause Hallucinations

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We’re not talking about the dash of nutmeg in your Christmas eggnog. You’d have to eat four to eight tablespoons of powdered nutmeg to experience hallucinations. It will also probably make you violently ill, so you’re better off trusting us on this one.

Sugar Gives You Wrinkles

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That second scoop of ice cream could be showing up on your face. A diet high in sugar causes glycation, which sets off a hormonal reaction resulting in dry, inelastic skin.

Miracle Fruit Can (Temporarily) Change Your Taste Buds

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This berry (Synsepalum dulcificum) causes sour foods, like lemons, to temporarily taste sweet. The effect lasts until the flavor swapping protein in the fruit is washed away by salvia, which usually takes about an hour.

Red Meat Can Cause Anaphylaxis After a Tick Bite

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Individuals bitten by the Lone Star Tick (a parasite found in the West, Midwest, and South) sometimes develop anaphylaxis after eating red meat. What’s even scarier is that many people test negative for the allergy on a skin prick test even after they’ve become allergic to red meat. Be careful hiking in Texas if you’re a fan of steak!


Is Eating The Orange Pith Healthy?

Growing up, I was always told to eat the pith of an orange because “that’s where all the nutrients are.” Is that true? What about eating orange peel?

The pith of oranges and other citrus fruits is the stringy, spongy white stuff between the peel (or zest) and the fruit. Most people strip it away before eating oranges, because they think it is bitter or inedible. Orange pith tends to be chewy, but it’s tasteless not bitter.

Some years ago, a Washington Post reporter did a pith taste test because he was puzzled that some of his cookbooks said its bitterness would ruin the taste of a dish, while his blender cookbook recommended grinding the pith, seeds and pulp into smoothies. He found orange pith to be tasteless but grapefruit pith to be quite bitter, leaving a lasting sting on the tongue. He reported lemon pith to be only mildly bitter. He also noted that the pith from all the fruits had a “rather unpleasant spongy chewiness.”

Although it’s certainly not where all the nutrients are, the pith can be good for you. It is high in fiber that may help lower cholesterol levels and contains as much vitamin C as the fruit itself. Pith also contains assorted flavonoids, including hesperidin, which may help blood vessels function better and may reduce inflammation. Another flavonoid found in oranges, including the pith and peel as well as the fruit, is naringenin, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and some ability to reduce carbohydrate absorption from the intestinal tract, possibly reducing rapid rises in blood sugar after eating. This could have some beneficial effect on weight management and metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors for stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Orange zest is also high in fiber and flavonoids as well as vitamins A, C, B5 and B6, plus calcium, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin and folate. However, it can be difficult to digest, and I don’t advise eating it (or grating into dishes) unless you take it from organic oranges. The peel of conventionally raised oranges is likely to contain pesticide residues that you can’t wash away. Another use for orange peel is to help repel garden slugs – simply chop and scatter it around plants. They’ll attract slugs, which you can then remove.


Is Eating The Orange Pith Healthy?

Growing up, I was always told to eat the pith of an orange because “that’s where all the nutrients are.” Is that true? What about eating orange peel?

The pith of oranges and other citrus fruits is the stringy, spongy white stuff between the peel (or zest) and the fruit. Most people strip it away before eating oranges, because they think it is bitter or inedible. Orange pith tends to be chewy, but it’s tasteless not bitter.

Some years ago, a Washington Post reporter did a pith taste test because he was puzzled that some of his cookbooks said its bitterness would ruin the taste of a dish, while his blender cookbook recommended grinding the pith, seeds and pulp into smoothies. He found orange pith to be tasteless but grapefruit pith to be quite bitter, leaving a lasting sting on the tongue. He reported lemon pith to be only mildly bitter. He also noted that the pith from all the fruits had a “rather unpleasant spongy chewiness.”

Although it’s certainly not where all the nutrients are, the pith can be good for you. It is high in fiber that may help lower cholesterol levels and contains as much vitamin C as the fruit itself. Pith also contains assorted flavonoids, including hesperidin, which may help blood vessels function better and may reduce inflammation. Another flavonoid found in oranges, including the pith and peel as well as the fruit, is naringenin, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and some ability to reduce carbohydrate absorption from the intestinal tract, possibly reducing rapid rises in blood sugar after eating. This could have some beneficial effect on weight management and metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors for stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Orange zest is also high in fiber and flavonoids as well as vitamins A, C, B5 and B6, plus calcium, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin and folate. However, it can be difficult to digest, and I don’t advise eating it (or grating into dishes) unless you take it from organic oranges. The peel of conventionally raised oranges is likely to contain pesticide residues that you can’t wash away. Another use for orange peel is to help repel garden slugs – simply chop and scatter it around plants. They’ll attract slugs, which you can then remove.


Is Eating The Orange Pith Healthy?

Growing up, I was always told to eat the pith of an orange because “that’s where all the nutrients are.” Is that true? What about eating orange peel?

The pith of oranges and other citrus fruits is the stringy, spongy white stuff between the peel (or zest) and the fruit. Most people strip it away before eating oranges, because they think it is bitter or inedible. Orange pith tends to be chewy, but it’s tasteless not bitter.

Some years ago, a Washington Post reporter did a pith taste test because he was puzzled that some of his cookbooks said its bitterness would ruin the taste of a dish, while his blender cookbook recommended grinding the pith, seeds and pulp into smoothies. He found orange pith to be tasteless but grapefruit pith to be quite bitter, leaving a lasting sting on the tongue. He reported lemon pith to be only mildly bitter. He also noted that the pith from all the fruits had a “rather unpleasant spongy chewiness.”

Although it’s certainly not where all the nutrients are, the pith can be good for you. It is high in fiber that may help lower cholesterol levels and contains as much vitamin C as the fruit itself. Pith also contains assorted flavonoids, including hesperidin, which may help blood vessels function better and may reduce inflammation. Another flavonoid found in oranges, including the pith and peel as well as the fruit, is naringenin, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and some ability to reduce carbohydrate absorption from the intestinal tract, possibly reducing rapid rises in blood sugar after eating. This could have some beneficial effect on weight management and metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors for stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Orange zest is also high in fiber and flavonoids as well as vitamins A, C, B5 and B6, plus calcium, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin and folate. However, it can be difficult to digest, and I don’t advise eating it (or grating into dishes) unless you take it from organic oranges. The peel of conventionally raised oranges is likely to contain pesticide residues that you can’t wash away. Another use for orange peel is to help repel garden slugs – simply chop and scatter it around plants. They’ll attract slugs, which you can then remove.


Is Eating The Orange Pith Healthy?

Growing up, I was always told to eat the pith of an orange because “that’s where all the nutrients are.” Is that true? What about eating orange peel?

The pith of oranges and other citrus fruits is the stringy, spongy white stuff between the peel (or zest) and the fruit. Most people strip it away before eating oranges, because they think it is bitter or inedible. Orange pith tends to be chewy, but it’s tasteless not bitter.

Some years ago, a Washington Post reporter did a pith taste test because he was puzzled that some of his cookbooks said its bitterness would ruin the taste of a dish, while his blender cookbook recommended grinding the pith, seeds and pulp into smoothies. He found orange pith to be tasteless but grapefruit pith to be quite bitter, leaving a lasting sting on the tongue. He reported lemon pith to be only mildly bitter. He also noted that the pith from all the fruits had a “rather unpleasant spongy chewiness.”

Although it’s certainly not where all the nutrients are, the pith can be good for you. It is high in fiber that may help lower cholesterol levels and contains as much vitamin C as the fruit itself. Pith also contains assorted flavonoids, including hesperidin, which may help blood vessels function better and may reduce inflammation. Another flavonoid found in oranges, including the pith and peel as well as the fruit, is naringenin, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and some ability to reduce carbohydrate absorption from the intestinal tract, possibly reducing rapid rises in blood sugar after eating. This could have some beneficial effect on weight management and metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors for stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Orange zest is also high in fiber and flavonoids as well as vitamins A, C, B5 and B6, plus calcium, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin and folate. However, it can be difficult to digest, and I don’t advise eating it (or grating into dishes) unless you take it from organic oranges. The peel of conventionally raised oranges is likely to contain pesticide residues that you can’t wash away. Another use for orange peel is to help repel garden slugs – simply chop and scatter it around plants. They’ll attract slugs, which you can then remove.


Is Eating The Orange Pith Healthy?

Growing up, I was always told to eat the pith of an orange because “that’s where all the nutrients are.” Is that true? What about eating orange peel?

The pith of oranges and other citrus fruits is the stringy, spongy white stuff between the peel (or zest) and the fruit. Most people strip it away before eating oranges, because they think it is bitter or inedible. Orange pith tends to be chewy, but it’s tasteless not bitter.

Some years ago, a Washington Post reporter did a pith taste test because he was puzzled that some of his cookbooks said its bitterness would ruin the taste of a dish, while his blender cookbook recommended grinding the pith, seeds and pulp into smoothies. He found orange pith to be tasteless but grapefruit pith to be quite bitter, leaving a lasting sting on the tongue. He reported lemon pith to be only mildly bitter. He also noted that the pith from all the fruits had a “rather unpleasant spongy chewiness.”

Although it’s certainly not where all the nutrients are, the pith can be good for you. It is high in fiber that may help lower cholesterol levels and contains as much vitamin C as the fruit itself. Pith also contains assorted flavonoids, including hesperidin, which may help blood vessels function better and may reduce inflammation. Another flavonoid found in oranges, including the pith and peel as well as the fruit, is naringenin, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and some ability to reduce carbohydrate absorption from the intestinal tract, possibly reducing rapid rises in blood sugar after eating. This could have some beneficial effect on weight management and metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors for stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Orange zest is also high in fiber and flavonoids as well as vitamins A, C, B5 and B6, plus calcium, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin and folate. However, it can be difficult to digest, and I don’t advise eating it (or grating into dishes) unless you take it from organic oranges. The peel of conventionally raised oranges is likely to contain pesticide residues that you can’t wash away. Another use for orange peel is to help repel garden slugs – simply chop and scatter it around plants. They’ll attract slugs, which you can then remove.


Is Eating The Orange Pith Healthy?

Growing up, I was always told to eat the pith of an orange because “that’s where all the nutrients are.” Is that true? What about eating orange peel?

The pith of oranges and other citrus fruits is the stringy, spongy white stuff between the peel (or zest) and the fruit. Most people strip it away before eating oranges, because they think it is bitter or inedible. Orange pith tends to be chewy, but it’s tasteless not bitter.

Some years ago, a Washington Post reporter did a pith taste test because he was puzzled that some of his cookbooks said its bitterness would ruin the taste of a dish, while his blender cookbook recommended grinding the pith, seeds and pulp into smoothies. He found orange pith to be tasteless but grapefruit pith to be quite bitter, leaving a lasting sting on the tongue. He reported lemon pith to be only mildly bitter. He also noted that the pith from all the fruits had a “rather unpleasant spongy chewiness.”

Although it’s certainly not where all the nutrients are, the pith can be good for you. It is high in fiber that may help lower cholesterol levels and contains as much vitamin C as the fruit itself. Pith also contains assorted flavonoids, including hesperidin, which may help blood vessels function better and may reduce inflammation. Another flavonoid found in oranges, including the pith and peel as well as the fruit, is naringenin, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and some ability to reduce carbohydrate absorption from the intestinal tract, possibly reducing rapid rises in blood sugar after eating. This could have some beneficial effect on weight management and metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors for stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Orange zest is also high in fiber and flavonoids as well as vitamins A, C, B5 and B6, plus calcium, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin and folate. However, it can be difficult to digest, and I don’t advise eating it (or grating into dishes) unless you take it from organic oranges. The peel of conventionally raised oranges is likely to contain pesticide residues that you can’t wash away. Another use for orange peel is to help repel garden slugs – simply chop and scatter it around plants. They’ll attract slugs, which you can then remove.


Is Eating The Orange Pith Healthy?

Growing up, I was always told to eat the pith of an orange because “that’s where all the nutrients are.” Is that true? What about eating orange peel?

The pith of oranges and other citrus fruits is the stringy, spongy white stuff between the peel (or zest) and the fruit. Most people strip it away before eating oranges, because they think it is bitter or inedible. Orange pith tends to be chewy, but it’s tasteless not bitter.

Some years ago, a Washington Post reporter did a pith taste test because he was puzzled that some of his cookbooks said its bitterness would ruin the taste of a dish, while his blender cookbook recommended grinding the pith, seeds and pulp into smoothies. He found orange pith to be tasteless but grapefruit pith to be quite bitter, leaving a lasting sting on the tongue. He reported lemon pith to be only mildly bitter. He also noted that the pith from all the fruits had a “rather unpleasant spongy chewiness.”

Although it’s certainly not where all the nutrients are, the pith can be good for you. It is high in fiber that may help lower cholesterol levels and contains as much vitamin C as the fruit itself. Pith also contains assorted flavonoids, including hesperidin, which may help blood vessels function better and may reduce inflammation. Another flavonoid found in oranges, including the pith and peel as well as the fruit, is naringenin, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and some ability to reduce carbohydrate absorption from the intestinal tract, possibly reducing rapid rises in blood sugar after eating. This could have some beneficial effect on weight management and metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors for stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Orange zest is also high in fiber and flavonoids as well as vitamins A, C, B5 and B6, plus calcium, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin and folate. However, it can be difficult to digest, and I don’t advise eating it (or grating into dishes) unless you take it from organic oranges. The peel of conventionally raised oranges is likely to contain pesticide residues that you can’t wash away. Another use for orange peel is to help repel garden slugs – simply chop and scatter it around plants. They’ll attract slugs, which you can then remove.


Is Eating The Orange Pith Healthy?

Growing up, I was always told to eat the pith of an orange because “that’s where all the nutrients are.” Is that true? What about eating orange peel?

The pith of oranges and other citrus fruits is the stringy, spongy white stuff between the peel (or zest) and the fruit. Most people strip it away before eating oranges, because they think it is bitter or inedible. Orange pith tends to be chewy, but it’s tasteless not bitter.

Some years ago, a Washington Post reporter did a pith taste test because he was puzzled that some of his cookbooks said its bitterness would ruin the taste of a dish, while his blender cookbook recommended grinding the pith, seeds and pulp into smoothies. He found orange pith to be tasteless but grapefruit pith to be quite bitter, leaving a lasting sting on the tongue. He reported lemon pith to be only mildly bitter. He also noted that the pith from all the fruits had a “rather unpleasant spongy chewiness.”

Although it’s certainly not where all the nutrients are, the pith can be good for you. It is high in fiber that may help lower cholesterol levels and contains as much vitamin C as the fruit itself. Pith also contains assorted flavonoids, including hesperidin, which may help blood vessels function better and may reduce inflammation. Another flavonoid found in oranges, including the pith and peel as well as the fruit, is naringenin, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and some ability to reduce carbohydrate absorption from the intestinal tract, possibly reducing rapid rises in blood sugar after eating. This could have some beneficial effect on weight management and metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors for stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Orange zest is also high in fiber and flavonoids as well as vitamins A, C, B5 and B6, plus calcium, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin and folate. However, it can be difficult to digest, and I don’t advise eating it (or grating into dishes) unless you take it from organic oranges. The peel of conventionally raised oranges is likely to contain pesticide residues that you can’t wash away. Another use for orange peel is to help repel garden slugs – simply chop and scatter it around plants. They’ll attract slugs, which you can then remove.


Is Eating The Orange Pith Healthy?

Growing up, I was always told to eat the pith of an orange because “that’s where all the nutrients are.” Is that true? What about eating orange peel?

The pith of oranges and other citrus fruits is the stringy, spongy white stuff between the peel (or zest) and the fruit. Most people strip it away before eating oranges, because they think it is bitter or inedible. Orange pith tends to be chewy, but it’s tasteless not bitter.

Some years ago, a Washington Post reporter did a pith taste test because he was puzzled that some of his cookbooks said its bitterness would ruin the taste of a dish, while his blender cookbook recommended grinding the pith, seeds and pulp into smoothies. He found orange pith to be tasteless but grapefruit pith to be quite bitter, leaving a lasting sting on the tongue. He reported lemon pith to be only mildly bitter. He also noted that the pith from all the fruits had a “rather unpleasant spongy chewiness.”

Although it’s certainly not where all the nutrients are, the pith can be good for you. It is high in fiber that may help lower cholesterol levels and contains as much vitamin C as the fruit itself. Pith also contains assorted flavonoids, including hesperidin, which may help blood vessels function better and may reduce inflammation. Another flavonoid found in oranges, including the pith and peel as well as the fruit, is naringenin, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and some ability to reduce carbohydrate absorption from the intestinal tract, possibly reducing rapid rises in blood sugar after eating. This could have some beneficial effect on weight management and metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors for stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Orange zest is also high in fiber and flavonoids as well as vitamins A, C, B5 and B6, plus calcium, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin and folate. However, it can be difficult to digest, and I don’t advise eating it (or grating into dishes) unless you take it from organic oranges. The peel of conventionally raised oranges is likely to contain pesticide residues that you can’t wash away. Another use for orange peel is to help repel garden slugs – simply chop and scatter it around plants. They’ll attract slugs, which you can then remove.


Is Eating The Orange Pith Healthy?

Growing up, I was always told to eat the pith of an orange because “that’s where all the nutrients are.” Is that true? What about eating orange peel?

The pith of oranges and other citrus fruits is the stringy, spongy white stuff between the peel (or zest) and the fruit. Most people strip it away before eating oranges, because they think it is bitter or inedible. Orange pith tends to be chewy, but it’s tasteless not bitter.

Some years ago, a Washington Post reporter did a pith taste test because he was puzzled that some of his cookbooks said its bitterness would ruin the taste of a dish, while his blender cookbook recommended grinding the pith, seeds and pulp into smoothies. He found orange pith to be tasteless but grapefruit pith to be quite bitter, leaving a lasting sting on the tongue. He reported lemon pith to be only mildly bitter. He also noted that the pith from all the fruits had a “rather unpleasant spongy chewiness.”

Although it’s certainly not where all the nutrients are, the pith can be good for you. It is high in fiber that may help lower cholesterol levels and contains as much vitamin C as the fruit itself. Pith also contains assorted flavonoids, including hesperidin, which may help blood vessels function better and may reduce inflammation. Another flavonoid found in oranges, including the pith and peel as well as the fruit, is naringenin, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and some ability to reduce carbohydrate absorption from the intestinal tract, possibly reducing rapid rises in blood sugar after eating. This could have some beneficial effect on weight management and metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors for stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

Orange zest is also high in fiber and flavonoids as well as vitamins A, C, B5 and B6, plus calcium, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin and folate. However, it can be difficult to digest, and I don’t advise eating it (or grating into dishes) unless you take it from organic oranges. The peel of conventionally raised oranges is likely to contain pesticide residues that you can’t wash away. Another use for orange peel is to help repel garden slugs – simply chop and scatter it around plants. They’ll attract slugs, which you can then remove.


Watch the video: Frank Sinatra- Ive got you under my skin (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Meliadus

    Just that is necessary.

  2. Gaarwine

    Excuse me, it is taken away

  3. Javier

    the unsuccessful thought

  4. Jaxon

    I agree with all of the above-said. Let us try to discuss the matter.

  5. Galkree

    I'll take it at my own risk)))



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